Handbook of Research in International Marketing
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Handbook of Research in International Marketing

  • Elgar original reference

Edited by Subhash C. Jain

Presenting the challenges and opportunities ahead, the contributors to this volume critically examine the current status and future direction of research in international marketing. The result of a sustained and lively dialogue among contributors from a variety of cultures, this volume gathers their perspectives and many insights on the revitalization of the field.
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Chapter 17: Roles and Consequences of Electronic Commerce in Global Marketing

Saeed Samiee

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17. Roles and consequences of electronic commerce in global marketing Saeed Samiee INTRODUCTION The Internet is one of the most significant marketing tools for the global marketplace. Estimates from various electronic commerce (e-commerce) surveys indicate that Internet users worldwide will more than double from approximately 318 million in 2000 to about 717 million in 2005 (users/1000 will also double from 53 to 111) (Pastore 1999). According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), about 60 per cent of the worldwide online audience now comes from outside the USA and is expected to generate 46 per cent of global e-commerce spending by 2003, as compared with 26 per cent in 1998 (IDC 1999). In particular, Western Europe’s e-commerce sector is expected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 138 per cent and result in e-commerce sales of US$430 billion by 2003 as compared to just US$5.6 billion in 1998. Japan and other Asia-Pacific nations constitute the second fastest growing area. The Internet has potentially significant ramifications and benefits for global marketing and, consequently, global e-commerce. As it continues to evolve, it is difficult to predict innovations, applications, and additional uses that will become available in the future.1 Contemporary perspectives regarding its roles and consequences in global marketing are shaped by our current knowledge rather than infinite wisdom about the future. Thus, the Internet and the corresponding technologies being developed may have significant implications for global marketing which may render current...

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