Handbook of the International Political Economy of Governance
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Handbook of the International Political Economy of Governance

  • Handbooks of Research on International Political Economy series

Edited by Anthony Payne and Nicola Phillips

Since the 1990s many of the assumptions that anchored the study of governance in international political economy (IPE) have been shaken loose. Reflecting on the intriguing and important processes of change that have occurred, and are occurring, Professors Anthony Payne and Nicola Phillips bring together the best research currently being undertaken in the field. They explore the complex ways that the global political economy is presently being governed, and indeed misgoverned.
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Conclusion: the governance of the international political economy

Anthony Payne and Nicola Phillips

Extract

We observed in the Introduction to this volume that, during the 1990s and early 2000s, we thought that we knew what we were dealing with in terms of the core structural, ideological and political forces at play in relation to the governance of the international political economy, and openly acknowledged that these moorings had been loosened by a range of trends and events experienced since 2007-08. By implication at least, we offered up the contents of this book as a means to reach that firmer ground on which the field could perhaps again rest for a period. To that end, a large number of thorough, detailed studies of important aspects of the governance of the international political economy have been gathered together in the preceding pages. They represent the best of current research and draw on the knowledge and insights of some of the most promising and most experienced political economists presently working in the global academy. And yet it has to be conceded that we are not at all sure that we have collectively succeeded in charting a way to the firmer understanding that we sought. We readily make this admission, but in fairness we move on quickly to say that we do not think this is due to shortcomings in our collective analytical powers in this volume.

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