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Endogenous Innovation

The Economics of an Emergent System Property

Cristiano Antonelli

This ground-breaking new book builds upon the Schumpeterian creative response. The author shows that firms, in out-of-equilibrium conditions, try and react by means of introducing innovations. The success of their reaction is contingent upon their access conditions to knowledge, which are shaped by the system in which they operate. The emergence of new innovations can, in turn, knock firms further out-of-equilibrium and cause changes in the system properties that govern their access to external knowledge. This path dependent loop of interactions between the system properties and the individual actions of firms, accounts for endogenous innovation and the dynamics of the system.
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Chapter 11: Technological congruence and the economic complexity of technological change

The Economics of an Emergent System Property

Cristiano Antonelli

Extract

Technological congruence is an emergent system property defined by the match between the relative size of output elasticity and the relative abundance and cost of inputs in local factor markets. With given total costs, output is larger the larger is the output elasticity of the cheapest input. Technological congruence is a powerful tool that helps in grasping the economic complexity of technological change with respect to determinants of the direction of technological change and its effects in terms of growth accounting and specialization, both at the firm and the system level. Its appreciation stems directly from advances in the economics of innovation in understanding the endogenous determinants of the introduction and diffusion of directed technological changes. Technological congruence is most relevant to influence the actual levels of total factor productivity of new technologies and, consequently, to shape the competitive advance of firms and countries.

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