Handbook of Water Economics
Show Less

Handbook of Water Economics

Edited by Ariel Dinar and Kurt Schwabe

Water scarcity, whether in the quality or quantity dimension, afflicts most countries. Decisions on water management and allocation over time, space, and among uses and users involve economic considerations. This Handbook assembles research that represents recent thinking and applications in water economics. The book chapters are written by leading scholars in the field who address issues related to its use, management, and value. The topics cover analytical methods, sectoral and intersectoral water issues, and issues associated with different sources of water.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details

Chapter 5: Agricultural water management

Sarah Ann Wheeler, Rosalind Bark, Adam Loch and Jeff Connor

Extract

Sustainable water management is one of the greatest twenty-first-century challenges; supply shortage is cited as one of the gravest risks facing society (World Economic Forum, 2013). Some 1.6 billion people live in regions experiencing severe water stress; by 2050 this is projected to increase to 3.9 billion people (OECD, 2012). Water scarcity has been defined as the point at which the aggregate impact of all users impinges on the supply or quality of water under prevailing institutional arrangements to the extent that the demand by all sectors, including the environment, cannot be satisfied fully. (UN Water, 2006: 4) Hence scarcity is a consequence of demand, supply and governance.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.