Peace and Justice at the International Criminal Court
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Peace and Justice at the International Criminal Court

A Court of Last Resort, Second Edition

Errol P. Mendes

This book focuses on how the International Criminal Court seeks accountability for the most serious crimes. Errol P. Mendes dives deep into the facts and rulings of the Court that involved some of the most serious conflicts in recent times to demonstrate that justice is critical for sustainable peace. What results is a detailed but honest critique of where the Court succeeds and where it needs to improve. The author goes on to provide a prediction of the greatest challenges facing the Court in the foreseeable future. This book is a valuable resource for academics and students in international criminal law and practice, public international relations, political science, military and, war studies etc.
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Chapter 4: Is it peace, justice or a final military solution in the tragedy of northern Uganda?

Errol P. Mendes

Abstract

This chapter discusses whether a peaceful solution was ever possible to nearly three decades of conflict in northern Uganda, which included serious crimes committed by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and its commander Joseph Kony. In this first situation referred to the Court by the President of Uganda, the crimes included the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians and displacement of almost 90 per cent of the population. The chapter details how the LRA, even while it was pretending to be interested in a peaceful solution, continued committing crimes in the DRC and the border areas of Uganda, Sudan and the Central African Republic (CAR). The chapter concludes that today the remaining options seem to be either a military victory over the LRA or the arrest and transfer of Kony and the LRA indicted leaders to The Hague to face justice before the ICC as no peaceful solution was ever possible.

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