Settlements at the Edge
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Settlements at the Edge

Remote Human Settlements in Developed Nations

  • New Horizons in Regional Science series

Edited by Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen and Gertrude Saxinger

Settlements at the Edge examines the evolution, characteristics, functions and shifting economic basis of settlements in sparsely populated areas of developed nations. With a focus on demographic change, the book features theoretical and applied cases which explore the interface between demography, economy, well-being and the environment. This book offers a comprehensive and insightful knowledge base for understanding the role of population in shaping the development and histories of northern sparsely populated areas of developed nations including Alaska (USA), Australia, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland and other nations with territories within the Arctic Circle.
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Chapter 10: Re-evolution of growth pole settlements in northern peripheries? Reflecting the emergence of an LNG hub in Northern Australia with experiences from Northern Norway

Sveinung Eikeland, Trond Nilsen and Andrew Taylor

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10. evolution of growth pole Re- settlements in northern peripheries? Reflecting the emergence of an LNG hub in Northern Australia with experiences from Northern Norway Sveinung Eikeland, Trond Nilsen and Andrew Taylor INTRODUCTION Contemporary development of liquid natural gas (LNG) plants in northern remote areas is one part of the global shift from oil and coal sources for energy to cleaner natural gas supplies. In the Norwegian High North Policy, proclaimed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2006), natural resources (as well as climate change and good relations with Russia) were the important driving forces for encouraging global actors to enter n orthern areas. In recent decades strong demand for cleaner sources of energy in Asia has raised expectations of great prosperity for LNG-ed l development in northern parts of Australia, and particularly in the jurisdiction of the Northern Territory. With a growing number of countries and regions extracting oil and gas reserves, policy makers in these areas are eager to acquire benefits for local economies and communities from the extraction of resources. Policies for securing ‘local content’ are important, and often controversial, parts of negotiations for such developments. The extent of local content can be defined as the extent to which the output of the extractive industry generates further benefits to the economy and community beyond the direct contribution of its value- dding (Eikeland and Nilsen, 2016; Ovadia, 2014; a Tordo et al., 2013). Successive Northern Territory governments have articulated a desire for the capital city, Darwin, to become...

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