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The Economics of Open Access

On the Future of Academic Publishing

Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen

Addressing the recent debate on how the future of academic publishing might look in a purely digital environment, this book analyzes the experiences of researchers with, as well as attitudes towards, ‘Open Access’ (OA) publishing. Drawing on a unique, in-depth survey with more than 10,000 respondents from 25 countries, Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen discuss their findings in the light of recent policy attempts which have been trying to foster OA, revealing considerable shortcomings and lack of knowledge on fundamental features of the academic publishing market.
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Acknowledgments

Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen

The authors of this book are grateful to the many people who have made this project possible. Since a large part of the book is based on the international online survey we conducted between 2012 and 2015, we wish to thank all those who contributed to the success of the survey. This includes Simon Gattmann, Henning Grell, Ann-Katrin Hengevoß and André Plaster for technical support, Andreas Knobelsdorf, who familiarised us with serial price statistics, as well as Ivo Gico Jr. from the Universidade Católica de Brasília, Abdel-Hameed Nawar from the University of Cairo, P. G. Babu from the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research in Mumbai, Guido Westkamp from Queen Mary University of London, and Giancarlo F. Frosio from Stanford Law School for facilitating cooperation with the individual countries. Moreover, many people helped us translate the questionnaires into the languages of the countries covered by the survey and to gather essential contact data: Ella Azerad, Meltem Bayramli, Amélie van Belleghem, Julia Bodnarova, Audra Bohlen, Anne Sofie Brusendorff, Robin Burkill, Emanuela Carbonara, Elisabete Castro, Maria Cecilia Dómine, Niva Elkin-Koren, Elif Erdemoglu, Daniela Garcia Ferreira, Martin Fiala, Carolin Frey, Ariane Garciabueno, Galya Georgieva, Bart van Heeswijk, Nie Hua, Malin Hüttmann, Eglé Jonyke, Mate Kakas, Angeliki Karakoliou, Vaia Karapanou, Zara Kaushik, Klara Keglevic, Min Lin, Ann MacManus, Ilari Määttä, Jurate Misonyte, Irina Nikiforova, Iris de Orte, Konstantinos Pilpilidis, Alan Ralph, Taina Rintala, Mariam Saleh, Yun Schüler-Zhou, Margot Schüller, Mostafa Serour, Agnes Strauß and Damian Zajackowski.

We also wish to thank Daniel Meierrieks, our co-author for the evaluations of the surveys on a subset of the countries, as well as Jerg Gutmann, Manfred Kraft, Stefan Voigt and many scholars from several Law and Economics Associations in Europe, Asia and the Middle East for valuable comments. Special thanks go to Sönke Häseler, who not only commented extensively on earlier drafts but also provided meticulous proofreading. We also wish to thank Niklas Jochheim for his support in completing and formatting the bibliography and the index. Finally, we are truly grateful for the excellent cooperation with the staff at Edward Elgar Publishing, whose assistance with the publication of this book was invaluable.