Show Less
You do not have access to this content

Sustainable Growth Through Strategic Innovation

Driving Congruence in Capabilities

Mitsuru Kodama

From detailed reviews of existing dynamic capabilities, this book presents a theoretical model of a strategic innovation system as a corporate system capability to enable a large company to achieve strategic innovation. The book includes in-depth case studies to illustrate the importance of strategic innovation capabilities.
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 5: Capabilities congruence through collaboration management at Cisco

Driving Congruence in Capabilities

Mitsuru Kodama

Extract

This chapter considers and analyzes micromanagement elements of dynamic capabilities in a large corporation, through the example of the American Cisco Systems. Through the company’s “collaboration management,” practitioners in all management layers overcome various contradictions and take up the challenge of new innovation through strategic collaboration by forming company-wide networked collaborative organizations. Cisco enables the processes of creative dialogue, understanding and cooperation, and prompt decision-making and action by demonstrating dynamic capabilities that span different business units, and thus simultaneously executes radical innovation to create the new businesses of the future while regularly reinforcing incremental innovation for the company’s main businesses. Demonstrating dynamic capabilities through strategic collaboration centered on all staff including the middle managers and the executive in the company in this way enables the best ideas and opinions to be taken up by the organization quickly, and enables study and action on various problems as a team. This chapter considers and analyzes capabilities congruence between the five elements of dynamic capabilities needed to achieve sustainable growth through strategic innovation enabled by Cisco’s collaborative management as it changes the actions of staff and its corporate culture.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.