Show Less
You do not have access to this content

Fighting Terrorism at Source

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

This book offers a unique and insightful econometric evaluation of the policies used to fight transnational terrorism between 1990 and 2014 using a sample of 124 countries. It proves that foreign aid plays a crucial role by inducing recipient governments to protect the donors’ political and economic interests within their sphere of influence. In contrast, US troops on the ground are counter-productive as they increase the supply of terrorist attacks from the host countries, even though this effect has been significantly reduced by the Obama administration.
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 2: Targets and perpetrators of transnational terrorist attacks

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

Extract

Since World War II, one can distinguish three waves of terrorism, as pointed out by Shughart (2006). The first one was clearly motivated by nationalism, and refers to the struggle of the colonized people against the control of their country by the foreign powers of the time. The symbol of this wave of popular uprising is the events of Sétif in Algeria on May 8, 1945, which left many European dead bodies in the streets. This event opened the violent phase of the Algerian war, which eventually produced independence for the country in 1962 (Horne, 2006). This nationalist phase of terrorism was not qualitatively different from the partisan warfare against the German presence that erupted all over occupied Europe during World War II. Many similar uprisings took place in the 1950s and 1960s against the colonial powers in different parts of the world. Most of these anti-colonial movements had some support from the Soviet Union, which arguably sowed the seeds of the next wave of terrorism that affected mainly Western Europe. The extreme left terrorist movement, which broke out in the wake of the May 1968 riots and strikes in several European countries, was only marginally transnational, through some network connections with the Palestinian movement. Very violent groups such as Action Directe, Brigate Rosse, Red Army Fraction, and so on, perpetrated a series of precisely targeted attacks, in the name of the internationalist revolution. This was clearly an ideological movement, although it was again fighting European powers, but not...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.