Show Less
You do not have access to this content

Fighting Terrorism at Source

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

This book offers a unique and insightful econometric evaluation of the policies used to fight transnational terrorism between 1990 and 2014 using a sample of 124 countries. It proves that foreign aid plays a crucial role by inducing recipient governments to protect the donors’ political and economic interests within their sphere of influence. In contrast, US troops on the ground are counter-productive as they increase the supply of terrorist attacks from the host countries, even though this effect has been significantly reduced by the Obama administration.
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 6: Estimating the speed of terrorist responses

Using Foreign Aid to Delegate Global Security

Jean-Paul Azam and Véronique Thelen

Extract

Using a two-stage method to tease out causality, Chapter 5 has shown empirically, after Azam and Thelen (2008, 2010), that rich countries are allocating foreign aid across recipient countries with a view to abating terrorism, among other things, and that they are achieving a significant impact on the number of terrorist attacks exported by these countries. The econometric approach used is based on a structural model that views foreign aid as a payment delivered by the donors in return for the efforts invested by the recipient governments in fighting terrorism within their sphere of influence. The main findings turned out to be reassuringly robust across two methods of estimation over the 1990‒2014 period of a structural equation explaining the number of transnational terrorist attacks produced by the different countries. A two-stage control function approach was used to take due account of the endogeneity of some of the explanatory variables. Two robust results came out of these different cross-country and panel-data estimates, namely that countries receiving more foreign aid and countries better endowed in educational capital tend to produce significantly less terrorist attacks than the others. Like Azam and Thelen (2010), Chapter 5 obtained an additional striking result regarding the impact of military interventions on the number of terrorist attacks by country of origin. Whether the country hosting United States (US) soldiers is an oil exporter or not is an important determinant of the impact of their presence on the supply of terrorist attacks by the host country. A convergent...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.