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Water Supply in a Mega-City

A Political Ecology Analysis of Shanghai

Michael Webber, Jon Barnett, Brian Finlayson and Mark Wang

With the increasing threat of depleted and contaminated water supplies around the world, this book provides a timely and much needed analysis of how cities should manage this precious resource. Integrating the environmental, economic, political and socio-cultural dimensions of water management, the authors outline how future mega-city systems can maintain a high quality of life for its residents.
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Author biographies

Michael Webber, Jon Barnett, Brian Finlayson and Mark Wang

Jon Barnett is Professor in the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne. He is a political geographer who researches the impacts of, and responses to, environmental change on social systems in Australia, East Asia and the South Pacific. In addition to The Meaning of Environmental Security, Jon was a Lead Author for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and he is co-editor of the journal Global Environmental Change.

Brian Finlayson is a physical geographer with specialist expertise in geomorphology and environmental hydrology. He is an honorary principal fellow in the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne and guest Professor at East China Normal University, Shanghai. He has over 40 years’ experience as a university academic in undergraduate and graduate teaching programmes, graduate research supervision, research and consulting. He is the author (with Gordon and McMahon) of Stream Hydrology: An Introduction for Hydrologists. His current research is focused on the downstream impacts of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River, China.

Mark Wang is Professor in the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne. He is the author of Mega Urban Regions in China, the co-author of China’s Transition to a Global Economy, China’s Urban Space, Old Industrial Cities Seeking New Road of Reindustrialisation and co-editor of Towards Low Carbon Cities in China, Transforming Chinese Cities, Urban China in the New Era. He is also credited with numerous articles in a range of geography, migration and urban studies journals.

Michael Webber is Professor Emeritus in the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne. He is an economic geographer who for the past 20 years has been studying the transformation of working life and environmental management in China. This work has been published in such books as China’s Transition to a Global Economy (with Mark Wang and Ying Zhu), Making Capitalism in Rural China, and The Everyday Impact of Economic Reform in China (with Ying Zhu and John Benson). He is currently engaged, with his three co-authors and others, in a long-term study of the social and environmental implications of the South–North Water Transfer Project in China.

Nahui Zhen is a PhD graduate of the University of Melbourne’s School of Geography. Her research concerns environmental management policies within China, particularly public trust in management institutions.