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Transforming Gender and Family Relations

How Active Labour Market Policies Shaped the Dual Earner Model

Åsa Lundqvist

This book is about how the activation of women into paid work was accomplished. It looks at the ideational grounds and the concrete measures that created the conditions for increasing the employment ratio of women, and thus also a farewell to male breadwinning.
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Chapter 3: The activation project: mission, goals and visions

How Active Labour Market Policies Shaped the Dual Earner Model

Åsa Lundqvist

Extract

Chapter 3 aims to present the activation policies and measures directed towards women between the 1960s and the 1980s, especially those activities developed by the Activation Section. The Activation Section was established by the AMS in the early 1960s and charged with the development of concrete activation measures, both in terms of training and through information and persuasion campaigns and opinion-shaping activities and methods. The chapter begins with a discussion about female employment patterns more generally, and their location in the labour market. Subsequently, the work within the Activation Section is examined, emphasizing its overarching mission, organization and goals. It is followed by an analysis of the introduction of the Delegation for Gender Equality between Women and Men, which initiated various ‘breakthrough projects’ across the country mainly aiming at introducing female labour in male-dominated sectors and breaking gender segregation in the labour market.

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