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Transforming Gender and Family Relations

How Active Labour Market Policies Shaped the Dual Earner Model

Åsa Lundqvist

This book is about how the activation of women into paid work was accomplished. It looks at the ideational grounds and the concrete measures that created the conditions for increasing the employment ratio of women, and thus also a farewell to male breadwinning.
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Chapter 4: Activation through training

How Active Labour Market Policies Shaped the Dual Earner Model

Åsa Lundqvist

Extract

Chapter 4 is dedicated to vocational training as an activation measure. Vocational training was used as a central feature of active labour market measures as early as the late 1950s, mainly through special courses to educate or retrain women without gainful employment. In these early days, middle-aged women were targeted, but the group expanded and soon included all women without gainful employment. Various forms of education are analysed, including how women were recruited to vocational training. The chapter offers a brief introduction to the history of the expansion of vocational training, and its central role for labour market policy. Moreover, the relationship between regular education and vocational training is discussed, as are the initiatives to recruit women to male-dominated workplaces. This latter issue developed into a great concern at the time, involving the recruitment of working-class women into industrial work.

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