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Theories of Social Innovation

Danielle Logue

As we grapple with how to respond to some of the world’s most pressing problems, such as inequality, poverty and climate change, there is growing global interest in ‘social innovation’ as a potential solution. But what exactly is ‘social innovation’? This book describes three ways to theorise social innovation when seeking to manage and organize for both social and economic progress.
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Index

Danielle Logue

Acs, Z.J. 36–7

Adner, K. 29

Adner, R. 29

Aernoudt, R. 58, 59

Ahmad, A.J. 72

aim and structure of the book 1–5

Alford, R. 60, 61

Algoso, D. 17

Ambrosini, V. 29, 30, 41

Amit, R. 31

Anderson, B. 35, 36

Anderson, J. 7

Ansari, S. 22

Antadze, N. 11

articles/papers (on)

‘bottom of the pyramid’ markets (Harvard Business Review, 2002) 7, 39; see also Hammond, A. and Prahalad, C.K.

‘From spare change to real change: the social sector as a beta site for business innovation’ 7; see also Kanter, R.M.

‘Social innovation – management’s new dimension’ 6; see also Drucker, P.

Atkins, B.T. 56

Austin, J. 35, 67, 68, 71

Bapuji, H. 34, 42, 43, 45

Barman, E. 33, 46–7

Barney, J.B. 30, 41

Barringer, B.R. 29

Battilana, J. 8, 43, 44–5, 67

Bekkers, V.J.J.M. 13, 62, 63

Benneworth, P. 7

Bhatt, P. 72

Boje, D. 58

Bolis, L. 59

Boltanski, L. 33

Bornstein, E. 68

bottom of the pyramid 39–41; see also articles/papers

Bouckaert, G. 62, 64, 65

boundary organizations 94–5

Bowman, C. 29, 30, 41

Boxenbaum, E. 7

Brandenburger, A.M. 31

Branson, R. (Virgin CEO) 20

Brivot, M. 58

Brown, A.D. 57, 58

Brown, J.B. 57, 58

Cajaiba-Santana, G. 11, 13, 14, 28, 33

Caldwell, N.D. 37

Calhoun, C.33

Campbell, J.L. 18

chapter notes (for)

social innovation and its contemporary evolution 23

social innovation as institutional change 96

social innovation as polysemous 74

social innovation as social value creation, capture and distribution 49

social innovation: tensions in purpose and practice 165

chapter summaries (for)

social innovation and its contemporary evolution 22–7

social innovation as institutional change 95–6

social innovation as polysemous 73

social innovation as social value creation, capture and distribution 48–9

social innovation: tensions in purpose and practice 164

characteristics of social innovation 6, 11, 157

Cheney, G. 65

Chesbrough, H.W. 32, 63

Clark, C. 47

Clegg, S.R. 19

Coff, R.W. 31

collectivity 11, 18, 22

Collins, D. 57

cooperatives/cooperative movements

Fenwick Weavers’ Society – first cooperative, established in Scotland (1791) 8

Rochdale Equitable Pioneers Society 8–9

Crane, A. 34, 38

cross-sector 4, 7, 9, 15, 16, 17, 56, 67, 59, 65, 73

processes 20–21

Cunha, J. 7

Currie, G. 57

Dacin, M.T. 71

Dacin, P.A. 47

Dart, R. 68, 69

Davis, G.F. 37, 71

De Boisguilbert, P.L. 32

Dean, J.W. 41

decision-making in social innovation 106, 107, 114–18

Dees, J.G. 35, 36, 67, 68, 69

definition of social innovation 11, 12

Deiglmeier, K. 12

Dembek, K. 38

Dewey, J. 33

Dey, P. 70

Diener, E. 47

diversity 11, 16, 20

Djelic, M.L. 70

Dobbin, F. 70

Dorado, S. 67

Douglas, M. 29

drivers of (social) innovation 67–8

Drucker, P.F. 1, 3; see also articles/papers

and examples of social innovations 6–7

Dunleavy, P. 65

Dunn, M.B. 67

Durkheim, E. 33

Dzisi, S. 35

early usage of term ‘social innovation’ 6–9; see also articles/papers

Ebrahim, A. 44

economic value 33, 35, 36, 44

economy of social innovation 107, 108, 110–12

Edison, T. 8

Edwards, M. 63

Edwards-Schachter, M. 10, 11, 13, 15–16

Elkington, J. 8, 21, 35–6, 71

emerging tensions and debates in social innovation 18–22

problem–solution construction and coupling 19

embeddedness, power and politics 19–20

from the social innovation ‘hero’ individual to cross-sector processes 20–21

social innovation and inclusive innovation 21–2

Emerson, J. 68, 69

Evans, V. 56

Falkum, I.L. 56

Felicio, J.A. 35

fields 81, 82, 83, 84, 89–96

field-to-field relations 93

Fillmore, C.J. 56

finding morality in theory and practice 105–7

Fligstein, N. 70

Fong, C.T. 70

Foss, K. 66

Foss, N.J. 66

Franklin, B, 12

Friedland, R. 60, 61

Friedman, M. 39

Friedman, R. 39

Garrow, E.E. 69

Garud, R. 72

Gawell, M. 64

Gehman, J. 71

George, G. 21, 32

Gomes, L.A.V. 58

Gong, T. 64

Greenwood, R. 61, 70

Grimes, M. 17, 44, 46, 63, 71

Grohs, S. 68

Hall, J. 22

Hall, P.A. 64

Halme, M. 22

Hammond, A. 7, 39; see also articles/papers

Hargrave, T.J. 8

Harrison, J.S. 29

Hartigan, P. 8, 21, 71

Hasenfeld, Y. 69

Hazel, K.L. 15

Hehenberger, L. 72

Helfat, C.E. 30

Hinings, C.R. 47, 62, 70, 72

Höllerer, M.A. 37, 70

Hood, C. 62, 65

Humphreys, M. 57, 58

Hwang, H. 67

hybrids 85–6, 88

impact measurement tools (and) 136–44

commonly measured impacts in the GIIN 141; see also studies

cost-benefit analysis (CBA) 142

indices/banks of measures 141

results-based approaches 142–3

social return on investment (SROI) 143–4

theory of change or logic model 142

inclusive innovation 155–8

institutional complexity 60, 84, 93, 95

institutional domains 61, 70, 94, 150, 159–60, 162, 164

institutional infrastructure 84, 90, 91–2

institutional logics 59, 60, 61

institutional theory 81–2, 89, 95

institutional theory lens, use of to theorize social innovation 81–2

Jarvis, W.P. 39, 71

Jing, Y. 64

Jones, C. 67

Kanter, R.M. 7, 12, 70

Kapoor, R. 29

Kathuria, L.M. 39

Kivleniece, I. 29, 34

Klein, P.G. 66

Kolk, A. 39

Kramer, M. 17, 37–8, 71

Kroeger, A. 33, 47

Lawrence, T.B. 8, 10, 19, 20, 73

Lee, M. 8, 67

Lepak, D.P. 29, 30, 31, 41

Letts, C. 67

Locke, R.R. 70

logic of the market 70; see also social innovation and the private sector

Logue, D.M. 17, 19, 39, 63, 64, 71

Loughlin, J. 64

Lynn, L.E. 65

McCarthy, J.D. 9

McGowan, K. 8

McLean, M. 35

Mair, J. 21, 72

Mansbridge, J. 33

markets 105, 107–13

as embedded in society 111–12

Markides, C. 7

Marquis, C. 67

Marti, I. 72

Marx, K. 29

Mazzucato, M. 27, 29, 31, 43, 48

meta-review 6

Meyer, M. 67

Meyer, R.E. 37, 70

Miller, D.T. 12

Moore, M. 72

moral legitimacy 107, 112–14, 126

constructing, morality as temporal 112–14

morality 105–8, 112–17

in ‘economy’ 108–11

in ‘society’ 108–11

Morrell, K. 29

Moulaert, F. 10, 15, 21, 27

Mulgan, G. 8–9, 10, 11, 28, 60, 69

multi-level institutional view of social innovation (and) 82–95

fields: social innovation within and across fields 89–93

individual social entrepreneur as institutional entrepreneur 82–4

inter-field relations 93–5

organizations: social innovation as hybrid organizing 84–9

Mumford, M.D. 12, 15

Munir, K.A. 37

Murdock, A. 13, 70

Nalebuff, B.J. 31

NFP sector

drivers of (social) innovation in 67–8

logic of non-profit sector 67–8

resisting social innovation 69–70

social innovation as social enterprise 68–9

Nicholls, A. 13, 47, 67, 70, 71

Nightingale, F. 8

non-profit sector, logic of 67–8

Norman, R. 31

Olsen, M. 7

Onaga, E. 15

Osborne, S.P. 63, 65

Ostrom, E. 42, 48, 65–7

Otsyina, F.A. 35

paradox 83, 86–7

Parker, B. 7

partnerships 60, 63, 71

Peredo, A.M. 35

Peteraf, M.E. 30, 41

Peters, B.G. 64

Pfeffer, J. 70

Phillips, W. 13

Phills, J.A.J. 10, 12, 32, 37

phronesis 116–18

Pierre, J. 64

Pitelis, C.N. 30, 41

plurality 58, 60, 73

Pol, E. 10, 14, 28

Pollitt, C. 62, 64, 65

polycentric governance 151–5; see also Ostrom, E.

polysemy

applications of 57–9

arguments for theorizing social innovation as polysemous 55–6

collaboration 4, 10, 13, 18, 21, 34–5, 43, 44, 45, 46, 55, 59, 60, 62, 63, 65, 72, 73, 86, 93, 95, 96, 136, 149–50

and polysemic concepts 55, 56–7

polysemous 55–8, 73

see also institutional complexity; institutional domains; institutional logics; partnerships; plurality; social innovation as polysemous; social innovation in the NFP sector; social innovation in the private sector

Porter, M. 17, 31, 37–8, 71

Post, J.E. 68

Powell, W.W. 67

Prahalad, C.K. 7, 39; see also articles/papers

Priem, R.L. 41

public entrepreneurship 158–61

Puntoni, S. 57

Quelin, B. 29, 34, 37, 59

Rainwater, K. 57

Ramirez, R. 13, 15, 23, 27, 29, 31, 32, 41, 46

Randhawa, K. 17, 63

Reay, T. 62, 70

references 165–71

aim and structure of the book (introduction) 4–5

social innovation and its contemporary evolution 23–6

social innovation as institutional change 97–104

social innovation: morality, markets and theories of impact 118–21

social innovation as polysemous 74–80

social innovation as social value creation: capture and distribution 49–54

social innovation: tensions in purpose and practice 165–71

relationality 11, 18, 20

resisting social innovation 69–70

Ricardo, D. 29

Rittel, H.W. 62

Rogers, E.M. 20

Roper, J. 65

Roussy, M. 58

Rubalcaba, L. 11, 14–15, 16

Salamon, L. 68

Sawhill, J.C. 139

Scott, W.R. 62

sectoral understandings: public, not-for-profit and private sectors 60–67

Seelos, C. 21

Seitanidi, A. 34

Selsky, J.S. 7

Silveira, F.F. 11, 13, 16, 33

Singh, A. 39

Sinkovics, N. 40

Smith, A. 29, 39

Smith, S. 40

Smith, W.K. 68

social change 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, 17, 18

social enterprise 87–9, 92

social entrepreneurship, shared value, BoP markets 34

social impact 92, 94

social innovation and its contemporary evolution (and) 6–26

understanding social innovation across disciplines 9–18

crossing disciplines: reviewing the reviews of social innovation 13–16

identifying common insights of social innovation as a construct 16–18

seeking a definition of social innovation 11–13

social innovation and the evolution from CSR: role of business in society 70–71

social innovation as institutional change 81–104

social innovation: morality, markets and theories of impacts (and) 105–21; see also Smith, A.

society 109–13, 117

a theory of impact: practice and decision-making (and) 114–18

practising social innovation: phronesis and moral-relational judgement 116–18

theories of impact 114–15

social innovation in the NFP Sector 67–70

social innovation as polysemous 55–80

social innovation and the private sector 70–72

social innovation as process and outcome 27–32; see also Moulaert, F. and Urban Studies

multi-level understanding of value creation 30–31; see also Lepak, D.P.

traditional understandings of value creation and capture 29–32

social innovation and relationship to social entrepreneurship 71–2

social innovation as social enterprise 68–9

social innovation as social value creation, capture and distribution 27–54; see also social value

social innovation: tensions in purpose and practice (and) 122–64

governing collaborations (and) 148–64

challenges of governing cross-sector collaborations 149–51

conclusion 164

inclusive innovation 155–8

polycentric governance 151–5; see also Ostrom, E.

public entrepreneurship 158–61

systems of social innovation 161–3

managing hybridity (and) 123–31

degree and intensity of hybridity 123–5

hybrid organization creation and design 127–9; see also studies

integration processes and people 129–31

legitimizing hybridity 125–6

measuring impact (and) 132–48

accounting for impact 136–8

comparing interventions 138–9

emergence of social impact assessment and reporting 134–6

from social value to 132–3

theorizing measuring of impact: sociology of valuation and evaluation 144–7

using impact measurement tools 139–44; see also impact measurement tools

social structures 81, 91, 96

social value 8, 11, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23

capture 30, 33–41

creation 30, 33–41

distribution 29, 41–6

and impact measurement 46–8

entrepreneurship: individuals and organizational forms 35–7

as shared value: role of the corporation in society 37–9

theorizing social value creation, capture and distribution see subject entry

three perspectives 33–41

value co-production 27, 41

Soskice, D. 64

Spender, J.C. 70

Stark, D. 33

Storch, H. 32

Stott, N. 8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 35, 37, 70, 72, 73

studies (of/on)

30 leading non-profits and impact measurement tools (2001) 139–40; see also Sawhill, J.C. and Williamson, D.

developing an impact framework for clean energy sector (GIIN, 2016) 141

WISE organizations, France (2007): split between operating as non-profits and for-profits 128

Suddaby, R. 70

Suh, E. 47

Sundaramurthy, C. 40

Swyngedouw, E. 15

systems of social innovation 161–3

Taylor, S. 30

Teasdale, S. 70

Teixeira, A.A. 32

theorizing social value creation, capture and distribution 41–6

and models of social value distribution 43–6

on theorizing social value distribution 41–3

Thevenot, L. 33

Thornton, P.H. 33, 60, 61, 67, 70

Tilly, C. 9

Todaro, M. 40

Toepler, S. 62, 63

Tracey, P. 8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 35, 37, 70, 72, 73

Trist, E. 32

Trump, D. 20

Tummers, L.G. 13

Twersky, F. 68, 69

Urban Studies: Special Issue, three dimensions of social innovation 27–8

value co-production 27, 41

Van de Ven, A.H. 8

Van der Have, R.P. 11, 13, 14–15, 16

Van Wijk, J. 11, 21

Ville, S. 10, 14, 28

Vincente, A. 56

Voorberg, W.H. 13, 62–4

Waddock, S.A. 68

Wallace, M.L. 10, 11, 13, 15–16

Webber, M.M. 62

Weber, C. 33, 47

Weberian-style bureaucratic state administration 61

Weisbrod, B.A. 68

Westley, F. 8, 11

York, J.G. 70

Yunus, M. 21

Zahra, S.A. 36, 37

Zald, M.N. 9

Zilber, S.N. 11, 13, 16, 33

Zimmerman, B. 69

Zorn, D. 70

Zott, C. 31, 41