Show Less
You do not have access to this content

How to be an Academic Superhero

Establishing and Sustaining a Successful Career in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities

Iain Hay

In universities across the world, academics struggle to establish and sustain their careers while satisfying intensifying institutional demands. Drawing from the author’s decades of observation and experience in academia, this exceptional book responds to the challenges of fostering and sustaining a successful academic career.
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 12: Find the right job

Establishing and Sustaining a Successful Career in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities

Iain Hay

Extract





Not all universities are made equal. And just as the institution you receive your doctorate from can make a difference to the early stages of your academic career (Chapter 2), so your first or second job can make a profound difference to your career’s ongoing trajectory. If you work first in a role or at a university with heavy teaching demands there is a very good chance you will have less time and fewer opportunities to advance your research than you would at a larger, research-intensive university where high levels of high-quality research activity are expected and encouraged. And even if you do beat those odds (see Box 12.1 for a British example) some prestigious universities appear to discriminate against prospective faculty members on the basis of their past/current associations, irrespective of the candidate’s demonstrated performance (Oprisko, 2012). Indeed, as Clauset et al. (2015, p. 1) revealed in their vast US study: ‘Faculty hiring follows a common and steeply hierarchical structure that reflects profound social inequality among institutions’. There is a certain irony in this, for those who have excelled at more poorly regarded institutions may have some unique talents and characteristics that have allowed such exceptional performance.1 Nonetheless, institutional conceit may well underpin the circulation of academic staff amongst particular groups of universities (e.g., the UK’s Russell Group, Australia’s Group of Eight; the USA’s Ivy League and Tier 1 universities) with little movement between groups – except ‘downwards’ from more prestigious institutions to those of lesser...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.