Show Less
You do not have access to this content

Global Climate Justice

Proposals, Arguments and Justification

Olivier Godard

In this thoughtful and original book, social scientist Olivier Godard considers the ways in which arguments of justice cling to international efforts to address global climate change. Proposals made by governments, experts and NGOs as well as concepts and arguments born of moral and political philosophy are introduced and critically examined. Godard contributes to this important debate by showing why global climate justice is still controversial, despite it being a key issue of our times.
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 8: Climate justice in the light of justification theory

Proposals, Arguments and Justification

Olivier Godard

Extract

The French school of justification considers the type of arguments and tests used by ordinary people to overcome conflicts or find terms of agreements for cooperative action. It reveals the existence of a limited number of orders of justification which coexist in modern democratic societies. Each order is articulated around a specific common good and calls for coherence between the nature of the common good and the regulatory means used in a situation. For example, the market cannot be accepted in relation to the civic order (votes are not supposed to be for sale). The six legitimate orders are characterized by the following words: ‘inspired’, ‘domestic’, ‘celebrity’, ‘civic’, ‘industrial’ and ‘market’. Those orders share a common structure of principles, which is the architecture of the ‘polity’ model. In intermediate situations, hesitation about the right order of worth gives a critical role to the choice of an instrumental regime, which becomes an implicit decision on the relevant order. In turn, this choice reframes the issues of justice related to the situation. This is what happens with the construction of a new international regime for climate protection. Components of the civic, industrial, domestic and market orders are found. But the nature of the source of the problem, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, makes the industrial order the central element. Therefore, the current economic needs of each country should be the main reference. By contrast, an equal per capita allocation is the least appropriate. In any case, because of the uncertainty about long-term demographic dynamics, the per capita egalitarian approach is impossible to apply ex ante in an intertemporal context. The development of a global carbon market would reconfigure justice problems, mainly because carbon trading transforms a narrow justice problem focused on GHG emissions into a broader one of equitable distribution of economic wealth across the world. Climate justice is then condemned to incoherence or instability, oscillating between narrow and wide definitions.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.