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Negotiating Climate Change

A Forensic Analysis

Aynsley Kellow

This book examines how an error in global meta-policy set climate change negotiations on an unproductive course. The decision to base negotiations on the Montreal Protocol and overlook the importance of interests, it argues, institutionalised an approach doomed to fail. By analysing interests, science and norms in the process, and the neglect of ‘interactive minilateralism’, learning was delayed until the more promising Paris Agreement was finally concluded, only to encounter a Trump Presidency, which (ironically) might offer further learning opportunities.
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Chapter 4: Norms in climate negotiations

A Forensic Analysis

Aynsley Kellow

Extract

The close links between environment NGOs and scientists revealed by the Climategate emails is set out, and then a similarly close relationship between the two within the IPCC, where many of the scientists involved in the production of its assessment reports were relatively junior scientists, with NGO connections, and many of the more senior scientists themselves had demonstrable links with NGOs. The chapter shows that many normative campaigns on climate change issue resonate with the interests of the European Union, and then explores the role of strong normative devices in inhibiting policy learning and recasting energy interests – though in damaging ways. These strong normative forces have heightened partisan divisions and helped elect a US president who placed at risk global climate policy at the very moment when the lessons of the previous 25 years had finally been learned.

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