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Decisions

The Complexities of Individual and Organizational Decision-Making

Karin Brunsson and Nils Brunsson

Decisions and the complexity of decision-making are central topics in several social science disciplines, including those of social psychology, political science and the study of organizations. This book draws on insights from all of these disciplines and provides a concise overview of some of the most intriguing and salient observations and arguments in the research about decision-making. The book first deals with basic decision making logics and applies them to both individual and organizational decision making. The book then deals with consequences of decisions and the complications of making decisions in a political context, where many individuals and organizations are involved.
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About the authors

The Complexities of Individual and Organizational Decision-Making

Karin Brunsson and Nils Brunsson

Karin Brunsson is Associate Professor of business administration. She teaches management accounting and control at Uppsala University and Jönköping International Business School. Her main interests concern the development of management ideas. In particular, she assessed the immense influence of Henri Fayol (see The Notion of General Management, 2007 and The Teachings of Management, Perceptions in a Society of Organizations, 2017). Her recent articles include ‘Organizational Change in Intrusive and Non-Intrusive Environments’ (2016), ‘A dual perspective on management’ (2016) and ‘Regulating Interest-Free Banking’ (2017).

Nils Brunsson is Professor of management and affiliated to Uppsala University and Score (Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research) at the Stockholm School of Economics and Stockholm University, Sweden. He has held chairs in management at the Stockholm School of Economics and at Uppsala University. Brunsson has published almost 30 books in the field of management and organization studies, including The Irrational Organization, The Organization of Hypocrisy, Mechanisms of Hope, The Consequences of Decision-Making, A World of Standards, Reform as Routine and Meta-organizations as well as numerous articles. He has studied organizational decision-making, administrative reform and standardization. His current research interests include the organization of markets, partial organization, meta-organizations and the social construction of competition. Brunsson has received several awards for his research and teaching and he is an honorary member of the European Group for Organization Studies (EGOS).