Show Less
You do not have access to this content

Governing Compact Cities

How to Connect Planning, Design and Transport

Philipp Rode

Governing Compact Cities investigates how governments and other critical actors organise to enable compact urban growth, combining higher urban densities, mixed use and urban design quality with more walkable and public transport-oriented urban development. Philipp Rode draws on empirical evidence from London and Berlin to examine how urban policymakers, professionals and stakeholders have worked across disciplinary silos, geographic scales and different time horizons since the early 1990s.
Show Summary Details
This content is available to you

Acknowledgements

How to Connect Planning, Design and Transport

Philipp Rode

This book has been my companion for a long time. The considerable number of people who have helped me on this journey reflects this and I am immensely grateful for their support. I would first like to thank Fran Tonkiss, who has been my motivator, instructor and advisor from the very beginning of this project through to its final stages. I further owe a very special thanks to Richard Sennett, without whom this book would not exist, Ricky Burdett, who enabled me to work on this project by variously taking on roles as an advisor in critical moments and as a meticulous reviewer, and Anne Power for reminding me of writing for an audience beyond my own discipline.

Harry Dimitriou and Carsten Gertz played an essential role for completing this book and I thank them for their comprehensive, critical and constructive feedback. Halfway through my research, Bridget Hutter and Alan Mace provided me with fresh and critical feedback that enabled me to proceed in a more focused and rewarding direction thereafter. I must further express great gratitude to all my interviewees in Berlin and London who are, or have been, centrally embedded in local and national government, public administrations and various other institutions. Without their invaluable and in-depth insights and reflections, which they openly shared with me, this book would have been impossible. Those that agreed to their names being published are listed in the Appendix.

At different times of preparing this publication I was also fortunate to receive feedback and input from Tony Travers, Daniel Geiger, Savvas Verdis, Edgar Pieterse and Hilmar von Lojewski, as well as encouragement from Wolfgang Nowak, Ute Weiland, Dieter Läpple, Andy Altman and my brother, Christoph Rode. This work also benefited immensely from being embedded within an inspiring team at LSE Cities and from broader conversations and work with my colleagues over many years. For more specific input, I am thankful to Priya Shankar, Jens Kandt, Alexandra Gomes and Catarina Heeckt. I was also very lucky to have Ayesha Chari and Katherine Wallis agree to help editing this book. At Edward Elgar Publishing, I am grateful to Katy Crossan for commissioning the manuscript and to the great team overseeing the publication process.

This book has also been a loyal fellow traveller. It has joined me both physically and mentally on my travels and, as such, has profited from fresh ideas and new perspectives. Two locations abroad ultimately enabled it to come together: the homes of my families in Markdorf, Germany and Cali, Colombia. These places just worked for my work and I owe a great debt of gratitude to my mother Doris Rode and my Colombian family, Bertha and Edgard Cobo, and also Cirley Duarte, for enabling me to be so productive during time spent in their homes.

Finally, there is my own London-based family that needs to be thanked. Adriana has been the unique mix of critical advisor, tolerant companion and, above all, supporting partner that one can only wish for when embarking on a project like this. And then there are Olivia and Sasha, neither of whom were even born when I started to work on this book and who have seen their father, probably more often than they should, working away at something that appeared to have commandeered all his time. By now, being both of school age they are old enough to have some idea of what I was doing but, throughout, they have been tolerant of a father who may have been physically present but was all too often absent, engrossed in his thoughts.