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The Mobilities Paradox

A Critical Analysis

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

The theory of mobilities has gained great recognition and traction over recent decades, illustrating not only the influence of mobilities in daily life but also the rise and expansion of globalization worldwide. But what if this sense of mobilities is in fact an ideological bubble that provides the illusion of freedom whilst limiting our mobility or even keeping us immobile? This book reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the mobilities paradigm and in doing so constructs a bridge between Marxism and Cultural theory.
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Chapter 3: The rise of the nation-state and hospitality

A Critical Analysis

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

Extract

In this section the author discusses the role of hospitality as a configurator of nationhood and the nation-state. Here two important assumptions should be discussed. At a first glimpse, we detail how the nation-state disposed of disciplinary mechanisms to control nomadic groups. The imposition of national borders were confronted with old lifestyles which were proper for aboriginals. The arrival of nationhood ran in parallel with the acceptance of hospitality as a mainstream cultural value of cosmopolitan societies. Second, the idea of free transit, where the theory of mobilities begins is not new. It comes from the political usages of hospitality to discipline aborigines in the conquest of the Americas. As Anthony Pagden has amply validated, the conquest of the Americas was ideologically legitimated by the tergiversations of two significant theories coined in Europe; the thesis of free transit and the Western model of hospitality.

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