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The Mobilities Paradox

A Critical Analysis

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

The theory of mobilities has gained great recognition and traction over recent decades, illustrating not only the influence of mobilities in daily life but also the rise and expansion of globalization worldwide. But what if this sense of mobilities is in fact an ideological bubble that provides the illusion of freedom whilst limiting our mobility or even keeping us immobile? This book reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the mobilities paradigm and in doing so constructs a bridge between Marxism and Cultural theory.
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Chapter 7: Toward an epistemology of emotions

A Critical Analysis

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

Extract

Throughout modern global societies there is a propensity to stimulate sensations, emotions and consumption of immediate experiences, which pave the way for the rise of a culture of spectacle that subordinates spectatorship as never before. Many cultural theorists stress on the advance of a new cosmology where the present is not only subordinated to the future, but also emotions are politically manipulated to achieve broader consensus in the citizenry. This is why it is necessary to discuss a new epistemology which, based on emotions, breaks the center–periphery dependency. Over years science has experimented with the aim of creating a superman, stimulating the performance of the brain at the time, the adoption of disciplinary mechanisms tended to dispose from the body for immediate here-and-now experiences. Most certainly, the liberal condition of reproduction and consumption allowed by the expansion of capital constrained human contact to the keyboard of a personal computer. Digital technology has not only created a pseudo-reality where consumers may freely move but also the geographical borders of societies have been redrawn. This particularly means some substantial shifts in the way human relations are forged, the ways travels are planned and of course the role of alterity in urban contexts.

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