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Technology Transfer and US Public Sector Innovation

Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

Technology Transfer and US Public Sector Innovation provides an overview of US technology policies that are the genesis for observed technology transfer activities. By describing the technology transfer process from US federal laboratories and other public sector organizations, this exploration informs the reader in detail of how the transfer process behaves and the social benefits associated with it.
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References

Albert N. Link and Zachary T. Oliver

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