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Rethinking Law and Language

The Flagship ‘Speech’

Jan M. Broekman

The ‘law-language-law’ theme is deeply engraved in Occidental culture, more so than contemporary studies on the subject currently illustrate. This insightful book creates awareness of these cultural roots and shows how language and themes in law can be richer than studying a simple mutuality of motives. Rethinking Law and Language unveils today’s problems with the two faces of language: the analogue and the digital, on the basis of which our smart phones and Artificial Intelligence create modern life.
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Contents

Jan M. Broekman

Rethinking with the reader

1    Rethinking speech

1.1 The order of words

1.2 Topics to rethink

1.3 Waves literally experienced

1.3.1 Poetic language

1.3.2 Legal language

1.3.3 Hart and Joyce

1.4 The shining crystal

1.4.1 Spoken words

1.4.2 Speech

1.5 Rethinking the flagship

1.5.1 Rethinking change changes

1.5.2 Rethinking structured

References

INTERMEZZO 1    THE FLAGSHIP “IN EXTREMIS”

References

2    Hobbes’ frontispiece

Introduction

2.1 The frontispiece

2.2 The torso

2.2.1 Power

2.2.2 Content

2.2.3 Composure

2.3 Language

2.3.1 Silence

2.3.2 Contract

2.4 Natural law

2.4.1 New individualism

2.4.2 Emancipation

2.5 Contract, law, and language

2.5.1 Cornerstone

2.5.2 Sentence

2.5.3 Science

2.6 The truth of contract

2.6.1 Speech

2.6.2 Positions

2.6.3 The global gap

2.7 The Speaker–Hearer Model

References

INTERMEZZO    2 JOB’S OTHER OTHERNESS

INTERMEZZO    3 LIFE IN THE MOUTH

3    Von Savigny’s “people”

3.1 The Napoleonic Code

3.1.1 The Code poetic

3.1.2 The Code’s “other”

3.2 Von Savigny

3.2.1 Possession

3.2.2 Animus domini

3.2.3 Possession’s consciousness

3.2.4 Semiotic dimensions

3.3 Legal consciousness

3.3.1 Extra legem, intra ius

3.3.2 Sources of law

3.3.3 Interpretation

3.4 Von Savigny and Il’in

3.4.1 Consciousness and communication

3.4.2 Consciousness and politics

3.5 Von Savigny’s “people”

3.5.1 Volk and language

3.5.2 The riddle of the plural

3.5.3 Consciousness and communication

References

4    Signs signify

4.1 The key called “sign”

4.1.1 Six domains

4.1.1.1 Universe

4.1.1.2 Science

4.1.1.3 Language

4.1.1.4 Communication

4.1.1.5 Positions in speech

4.1.1.6 Body and text

4.2 The passion to signify

4.2.1 Peirce meets colleagues

4.2.2 J.I. de Haan’s legal significs

4.2.2.1 About words

4.2.2.2 Better law

4.2.2.3 Gesamtkunstwerk

4.3 Today and tomorrow

4.3.1 Gerrit Mannoury

4.3.2 Signifying is understanding

4.3.3 Signs, names, and speech

References

INTERMEZZO 4    THE SELFIE’S SELF

References

5    Structuralism and law

5.1 Constellations

5.1.1 Structuralism in hindsight

5.1.2 Language

5.1.3 Genetics

5.1.4 Cyberspace

5.2 Law and structuralism

5.2.1 Subjectivity

5.2.1.1 Deconstruction

5.2.1.2 Derrida

5.2.1.3 Communication

5.2.2 Hermeneutics

5.2.3 Text hermeneutics

5.3 Discourse

5.3.1 Foucault

5.3.2 Legal discourse

5.3.3 Features of a legal discourse

5.4 Structuralism and law

References

6    Alter’s presence

6.1 The “I”–“thou” essence

6.1.1 Word and speech

6.1.2 The birth of a word

6.1.3 Is “I” a word?

6.1.4 Alter’s immanence

6.2 The speech act

6.2.1 The speech act

6.2.2 Grammarian power

6.2.3 Recognizing alter

6.2.4 Speech act, speech event

6.3 Buber’s Grundwort

6.3.1 Philosophical considerations

6.3.2 The Groundword’s language

6.3.3 The Groundword’s inner dynamics

6.3.4 Inner speech and Groundword

6.3.4.1 Inner speech

6.3.4.2 Speaking the Groundword

6.3.4.3 Beyond the Speaker–Hearer Model

6.3.4.4 The riddle of “inner speech”

References

INTERMEZZO 5    CRYSTAL-CLEAR DARKNESS

7    What language, what law?

7.1 Lost in law

7.1.1 Words lost in law

7.1.2 Pronouns lost in law

7.1.3 Persons lost in law

7.2 Law’s persona ficta

7.3 What language, what law?

7.3.1 Language’s unity

7.3.2 Law’s eyes and ears

References

INTERMEZZO 6    POUND AND PEIRCE

Charles Sanders Peirce: A Sketch of Logical Critics, 1911

References

8    Word, seme, digit

8.1 Laboratory of the word

8.1.1 Mutation in language

8.1.2 Involved in speech

8.2 Words multidimensional

8.2.1 Plurality a word’s feature

8.2.2 Dominant forms of plurality

8.3 Conversion consequences

8.3.1 Dynamics in detail

8.3.2 Astrophysical notions

8.4 Conversion as motion

8.4.1 Data and conversions

8.4.2 Essential conversions

8.5 Legal language and conversion

8.5.1 Law and AD/DA conversions

8.5.2 Conversion focus on law

8.5.3 Legal branches and conversions

8.5.3.1 Cyber law

8.5.3.2 A cyber law critique

8.5.3.3 Datafication and artificial intelligence

8.5.3.4 New profiles facing law–language

8.6 Speech

References

9    The flagship’s wreckage

9.1 Life in conversions

9.2 Words in conversion

9.2.1 Property and speech

9.2.2 Conversion and datafication

9.3 Ten words in protocol

9.3.1 Pronouns articulated

9.3.2 Lingual patterns articulated

9.3.3 Connections’ connectivity

9.3.4 Datafication and hermeneutics

9.4 The threats of wreckage

9.4.1 Words in motion

9.4.2 Lost in motion

9.4.3 Endangered speech

9.4.4 Saying law, saving law

References

General index