Multinational Enterprises and Emerging Economies
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Multinational Enterprises and Emerging Economies

Klaus E. Meyer

Guided by the overarching question “how and why does the emerging economy context matter for business?”, this collection brings together key contributions of Klaus Meyer on multinational enterprises (MNEs) competing in, and originating from, emerging economies. The book also explores how outward investment strategies contribute to building internationally competitive MNEs.
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Chapter 7: Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies

Klaus E. Meyer, Saul Estrin, Sumon Kumar Bhaumik and Mike W. Peng

Abstract

We investigate the impact of market-supporting institutions on business strategies by analyzing the entry strategies of foreign investors entering emerging economies. We apply and advance the institution-based view of strategy by integrating it with resource-based considerations. In particular, we show how resource-seeking strategies are pursued using different entry modes in different institutional contexts. Alternative modes of entry - greenfield, acquisition, and joint venture (JV) - allow firms to overcome different kinds of market inefficiencies related to both characteristics of the resources and to the institutional context. In a weaker institutional framework, JVs are used to access many resources, but in a stronger institutional framework, JVs become less important while acquisitions can play a more important role in accessing resources that are intangible and organizationally embedded. Combining survey and archival data from four emerging economies, India, Vietnam, South Africa, and Egypt, we provide empirical support for our hypotheses. Copyright @ 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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