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From Innovation to Entrepreneurship

Connectivity-based Regional Development

Yasuyuki Motoyama

Innovation and entrepreneurship are often considered two sides of the same coin. But are the links between innovation and entrepreneurship as inextricable as we think? From Innovation to Entrepreneurship questions this seemingly interdependent relationship, highlighting the different requirements of innovation and entrepreneurship. This book disentangles theories of innovation and entrepreneurship, empirically revealing the overlaps and differences between them. Demonstrating that the pursuit of entrepreneurship is the key to economic development, Yasuyuki Motoyama explores the concept that people are at the heart of entrepreneurship ecosystems.
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Acknowledgments

Yasuyuki Motoyama

This book would not have been possible without help from so many friends and colleagues. It may be unconventional to thank co-authors, but I would like to because their ideas made this book better: Heike Mayer, Arnobio Morelix, Colin Tomkins-Bergh, Karren Knowlton, Jim Brasunas, Steve Johnson, Stephan Goetz, and Yichael Han.

I had rare opportunities to present my book project at several Japanese universities even from an early stage, and their feedback was essential to improve my manuscript: For this I thank Manao Kidachi and Kappei Hidaka at Chuo University; Tetsutaro Okada at Kagawa University; Takeshi Fujimoto, Masanori Namba, and Kanichiro Suzuki at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. In addition, Ben Spigel and Fumi Kitagawa at the University of Edinburgh, as well as Thomas Funke at RKW in Frankfurt, gave me opportunities to present at their universities. Emil Malizia kindly hosted a seminar at the University of North Carolina, and I appreciate feedback from Maryann Feldman, Nichola Lowe, Bill Lester, Mary Donegan, and others. In addition, Emil Malizia has been a great collaborator, scholar, and mentor throughout past research projects. Thanks to Richard Freeman for letting me present at Harvard Business School.

I would also like to thank my former Kauffman colleagues. Dane Stangler was a visionary leader who supported my research from the very beginning. Jason Wiens and Evan Absher taught me how policymakers think and how we can talk to them. Rachel Carlton and Jonathan Robinson kept me engaged with entrepreneurship practitioners. Kate Maxwell, Jared Konzcal, Arnobio Morelix, Jordan Bell-Masterson, Alex Krause, Chris Jackson, and Emily Fetsch were bright research assistants. It was always fun to bounce book ideas to each other with Sam Arbesman. Michelle St. Clair and Mette Cramer took care of me in every unfilled dimension. Suren Dutia opened doors for me in St. Louis.

I am grateful to my former colleagues at the University of Kansas for their intellectual and spiritual support: Nate Brunsell, Jay Johnson, Shannon O’Lear, Barney Warf, and Alex Diener. Sarah Gowen and Beth Chapple patiently reviewed my manuscript. Katy Crossan was the most efficient acquisition editor. I am also grateful for my new colleagues at Ohio State University, and their inputs in February 2018 were helpful to finalize my manuscript. Ed Malecki and Ned Hill were great mentors.

Last but not least, I would like to thank my family for their love and patience. My parents did not mind listening to their son’s geeky talk even when he was unstoppable. Kai and Elyse gave me smiles and a meaning of life every day. My wife, Michelle, was always the first and last person that I could talk about any research idea, good or bad, and, she guided me in the right way in my life.

November 2018

Columbus, Ohio