The Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics
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The Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics An Introduction to Their Careers and Main Published Works

An Introduction to Their Careers and Main Published Works

Howard R. Vane and Chris Mulhearn

Erudite, accessible and lucidly written, this book provides a stimulating introduction to the careers and main published works of the Nobel Memorial Laureates in Economics. It will prove to be an invaluable reference book on key figures in economics and their path-breaking insights. The vignettes should also encourage the reader to sample some of the Laureates’ original works and gain a better understanding of the context in which new ideas were first put forward.
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Chapter 7: THE 1975 NOBEL MEMORIAL LAUREATES LEONID KANTOROVICH AND TJALLING KOOPMANS

Howard R. Vane and Chris Mulhearn

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THE 1975 NOBEL MEMORIAL LAUREATES LEONID KANTOROVICH AND TJALLING KOOPMANS LEONID KANTOROVICH Leonid V. Kantorovich (1912–86) © The Nobel Foundation Leonid Kantorovich was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia in 1912. His distinguished career can be divided into three main phases. The first involved his university education and subsequent period teaching and his research work in Leningrad4 until 1960. At the age of only 14 years he entered Leningrad State University to study mathematics and obtained his degree in 1930 and his doctorate in 1935. Kantorovich’s doctoral thesis on partially ordered function spaces led to the name ‘K-spaces’ in his honour. In the 1930s he taught mathematics at the Leningrad Institute of Construction Engineering and Leningrad State University, where he became a professor in 1934. Between 1948 and 1960 he was head of the department of mathematics at the Academy of Sciences in Leningrad. The second phase of Kantorovich’s career involved his work in Novosibirsk, where from 1960 to 1971 he was deputy director of the Siberian Institute of Mathematics. The final part of his career was spent working in Moscow. From 1971 to 1976, he was head of the Institute of National Economic Management, and from 1976 to 1986 head of the Institute of Systems Analysis of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow. 4 St Petersburg was renamed Leningrad following the Soviet revolution; it is now, once again, St Petersburg. 74 LEONID KANTOROVICH Kantorovich’s many offices and honours included: full membership of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR...

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