International Documents on Corporate Responsibility
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International Documents on Corporate Responsibility

Edited by Stephen Tully

International Documents on Corporate Responsibility includes the principal international, regional and national instruments drafted by intergovernmental organisations or states as well as codes of conduct formulated by industry associations, trade unions and non-governmental organisations. The coverage includes the fields of human rights, international criminal and environmental law, labour standards, international trade, armed conflict, sustainable development, corruption, consumer protection and corporate governance. Each document is accompanied by a brief explanatory commentary outlining the historical origins of the instrument, the principal actors involved, controversial negotiation issues, applicable implementation procedure, and identifies further reference material.
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Chapter 102: UN: The Suplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery, 1956

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102. UN: The Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery, 1956 Commentary: The Supplementary Convention (226 UNTS 3, entry into force 1957) broadened the 1926 Convention’s definition of slavery to include debt bondage, servile forms of marriage and the exploitation of children and adolescents. The OHCHR Working Group on Contemporary Forms of Slavery considers information on government measures to implement the three slavery-related Conventions: www.ohchr.org/english/issues/slavery/group.htm. A Voluntary Trust Fund has been established to facilitate NGO contributions to its deliberations and provide humanitarian, legal and financial assistance to victims: UNGA Resolution 46/122 (1991). See also, Fact Sheet No.14 (1991) on Contemporary Forms of Slavery, Geneva. Section I: Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery Article 1 Each of the States Parties to this Convention shall take all practicable and necessary legislative and other measures to bring about progressively and as soon as possible the complete abolition or abandonment of the following institutions and practices, where they still exist and whether or not they are covered by the definition of slavery contained in article 1 of the Slavery Convention signed at Geneva on 25 September 1926: (a) Debt bondage, that is to say, the status or condition arising from a pledge by a debtor of his personal services or of those of a person under his control as security for a debt, if the value of those services as reasonably assessed is not applied towards the liquidation of the debt or the length...

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