International Documents on Corporate Responsibility
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International Documents on Corporate Responsibility

Edited by Stephen Tully

International Documents on Corporate Responsibility includes the principal international, regional and national instruments drafted by intergovernmental organisations or states as well as codes of conduct formulated by industry associations, trade unions and non-governmental organisations. The coverage includes the fields of human rights, international criminal and environmental law, labour standards, international trade, armed conflict, sustainable development, corruption, consumer protection and corporate governance. Each document is accompanied by a brief explanatory commentary outlining the historical origins of the instrument, the principal actors involved, controversial negotiation issues, applicable implementation procedure, and identifies further reference material.
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Chapter 103: UN: Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others, 1949

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103. UN: Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others, 1949 Commentary: The Convention (96 UNTS 271, entry into force 1951) consolidated earlier agreements dating back to 1904. It targets the procurer rather than the prostitute and requires governments to introduce measures of prevention and rehabilitation. See also, UNHCHR (2002), ‘Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Trafficking’, E/2002/68/Add.1; UNICEF (2003), ‘Guidelines for the Protection of the Rights of Children Victims Trafficking in Southeastern Europe’; Inter-American Convention on International Traffic in Minors (1994) 79 OASTS. Article 1 The Parties to the present Convention agree to punish any person who, to gratify the passions of another: 1. 2. Procures, entices or leads away, for purposes of prostitution, another person, even with the consent of that person; Exploits the prostitution of another person, even with the consent of that person. Article 2 The Parties to the present Convention further agree to punish any person who: 1. 2. Keeps or manages, or knowingly finances or takes part in the financing of a brothel; Knowingly lets or rents a building or other place or any part thereof for the purpose of the prostitution of others. Article 3 To the extent permitted by domestic law, attempts to commit any of the offences referred to in articles 1 and 2, and acts preparatory to the commission thereof, shall also be punished. Article 4 To the extent permitted by domestic law, international participation in the acts referred...

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