Economics and Policies of an Enlarged Europe
Show Less

Economics and Policies of an Enlarged Europe

Carlo Altomonte and Mario Nava

Carlo Altomonte and Mario Nava have written a very rigorous text in an accessible and jargon-free style, ensuring easy acquisition of invaluable insights into the European economic set-up and the possible evolution of EU policies, including an update on the reform of the Growth and Stability Pact and of the 2007–13 Financial Perspectives.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 11: Conclusions

Carlo Altomonte and Mario Nava

Extract

11. Conclusions Writing the conclusions to a book that discusses a continuing process of integration is never easy, since there is no actual conclusion. To ease the task, we have decided to split the issue into two sections: the first section recalls the main themes and subjects tackled by the book, while the second looks at what has been left out of the book, and yet it may constitute an important challenge for the future of the EU. The first section may thus be read as a summary of the risks and opportunities that lie ahead of the enlarged Europe, and which were dealt with in detail in the book, while the second section may be read as a sketchy account of those risks and opportunities that lie ahead of the enlarged Europe and which were not dealt with in detail in the book. 11.1 THE LOGIC AND THE OBJECTIVES OF THE ENLARGED EU Far too often, in our professional and academic life, we have experienced discussions and analyses of the EU and its policies undertaken in a way which is, to say the least, piecemeal and centred on details, thus leading to a major confusion between the trees and the forest. In other words, we believe that a credible and informed discussion on, say, the EU agricultural policy or the EU competition policy, can only take place if the logic, the values and the objectives of the EU have been made explicit at the outset. Understanding, explaining and discussing...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.