International Handbook of Research on Indigenous Entrepreneurship
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International Handbook of Research on Indigenous Entrepreneurship

  • Elgar original reference

Edited by Léo-Paul Dana and Robert B. Anderson

The comprehensive and thoroughly accessible International Handbook of Research on Indigenous Entrepreneurship aims to develop a multidisciplinary theory explaining entrepreneurship as a function of cultural perceptions of opportunity. The Handbook presents a multitude of fascinating, superbly illustrated studies on the facets of entrepreneurship amongst indigenous peoples.
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Chapter 27: The Nk’Mip Cellars: Wine and Tourism with an Aboriginal Flavour

Robert B. Anderson, Scott McGillivray and Robert J. Giberson

Extract

27 The Nk’Mip Cellars: wine and tourism with an Aboriginal flavour Robert B. Anderson, Scott McGillivray and Robert J. Giberson Introduction In this chapter, we explore the economic development activities of the Osoyoos Indian Band (OIB) which has been working with business to preserve the past and strengthen the future of Indigenous people in British Columbia (Figure 27.1). The OIB lands are in the southern Okanagan Valley in British Columbia (Figure 27.2). The Okanagan Valley is one of two principal wine areas in Canada (the other is the Niagara Peninsula in the province of Ontario). Participation in the wine industry has been a key aspect of the OIB’s development activities over the past four decades. The Band began with vineyards in the 1960s. In 1980, a winery was built on the group’s lands. This winery is still in operation today, now owned by Vincor International Inc. Building on this success, in 2002, the OIB (51 per cent ownership) and Vincor (49 per cent ownership) opened a new vinery: Nk’Mip Cellars (Figure 27.3). Figure 27.1 Working with business (photo by Léo-Paul Dana © 2005) 336 The Nk’Mip Cellars: wine and tourism with an Aboriginal flavour 337 Figure 27.2 OIB lands (photo by Léo-Paul Dana © 2005) The vineyards and new winery are part of a larger OIB development undertaking, the Nk’Mip Project. Another key component of the project is the $5million Nk’Mip Desert and Heritage Interpretive Centre. The centre targets the growing market for cultural/ecotourism by educating visitors about 3000 years...

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