Successful Professional Women of the Americas
Show Less

Successful Professional Women of the Americas

From Polar Winds to Tropical Breezes

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas-Lujan and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

This accessible and original book relates the fascinating story of successful women across the Americas: women who are managers, business owners, university professors and administrators, doctors, lawyers and government ministers.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details

Chapter 9: Successful Professional Women in Mexico

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas-Lujan and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

Extract

9. Successful professional women in Mexico Miguel R. Olivas-Luján and Leticia Ramos Garza Malinche, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Josefa Ortiz de Domínguez, Frida Kahlo, Martha Sahagún de Fox: these are the names of a few of the most revered and simultaneously criticized Mexican women (see Table 9.1). From pre-colonial times to the twenty-first century, working women in Mexico have played a central, if mostly veiled role in all facets of society. Within this machista society – borrowing a characterization from Mexican Nobel Prize winner Octavio Paz (Gutmann, 2001), Mexican women have seen their participation in the workforce improve rapidly in the past 20 to 30 years but, as in many other countries, they still are a long way from reaching parity in most areas. This chapter is structured as follows: the next section describes how Mexico’s long tradition of endorsing international initiatives has gradually increased governmental support for women’s issues, although they have not been readily translated into more equitable business practices. Following that, we present an assortment of statistics that describe women’s role in the Mexican workforce and factors that have been found to affect it more strongly from a macroeconomic standpoint, including education, fertility rates, civil – including maternity – status and economic need. The section after that presents the results of our empirical study, with details from both quantitative and qualitative components. Finally, we conclude the chapter with some thoughts on how important it is that more attention be given to ensuring...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.