European Science and Technology Policy
Show Less

European Science and Technology Policy

Towards Integration or Fragmentation?

Edited by Henri Delanghe, Ugur Muldur and Luc Soete

This innovative book focuses on the most important concept underpinning current European Union research policy. It describes the history and concept of the European Research Area (ERA), analyses some of the underlying assumptions, assesses some of its achievements, and takes a brief look at its future.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details

Chapter 4: The ‘European Research Area’ Idea in the History of Community Policy-making

Luca Guzzetti

Extract

4. The ‘European Research Area’ idea in the history of Community policy-making Luca Guzzetti THE BEGINNINGS OF COMMUNITY RESEARCH POLICY 1 On 14 January 1974, the very first Council Resolution concerning Community scientific and technological research (coal/steel and nuclear research fields excluded) was taken; here is an excerpt from its text: Whereas the Heads of State or of Government meeting in Paris on 19 and 20 October 1972 expressed their determination to promote the development of a common policy in the field of science and technology and noted that such a policy would require the coordination of national policies within the Community institutions, and the joint implementation of projects of interest to the Community; . . . Article 1. In order to define objectives and ensure the development of a common policy in the field of science and technology involving the coordination of national policies and the joint implementation of projects of interest to the Community the following operations shall be progressively carried out within the Community: 1) the examination and comparison of Member States’ national policies in this field, particularly their potential, plans, programmes, projects, budgets, measures and methods in this field; 2) the identification, analysis and comparison of the objectives of the Member States in order to determine the common goals to be adopted and the appropriate ways and means of achieving them; 3) the coordination of national policies on the basis of 1 and 2 above with the aim of: eliminating unnecessary or unwarranted duplication of effort in national programmes,...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.