The Development of Competition Law
Show Less

The Development of Competition Law Global Perspectives

Global Perspectives

  • ASCOLA Competition Law series

Edited by Roger Zäch, Andreas Heinemann and Andreas Kellerhals

This innovative book discusses the global character of competition law focusing on three interrelated perspectives; firstly, the impact of economics on competition policy; secondly, the competition law experience in selected countries (USA, EU, Japan, India, China, Brazil, transition countries) and how the law has adapted to the political, economic, geographic and cultural environment; and thirdly, the process of internationalisation and convergence of competition law.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 6: Thirty Years of PRC Anti-monopoly Law under ‘State-Market’ Yardstick: From Retrospective and Prospective Viewpoints

Yong Huang and Shan Jiang

Extract

6. Thirty Years of PRC Antimonopoly Law under ‘State-Market’ Yardstick: From Retrospective and Prospective Viewpoints Yong Huang* and Shan Jiang** INTRODUCTION 1 The reform and opening-up of China has had a 30-year-long history since 1978 and the formation of the substantive anti-monopoly law in China has also gone through about thirty years from 1980, when the Temporary Regulation of the State Council on Expansion and Protection of the Socialist Competition was enacted, to 2007 and 2008, when the formal Anti-monopoly Law was enacted and became effective.1 Anti-monopoly law is deemed the ‘Magna Carta of free enterprise’2 in major developed countries in the western world, while the transplant of the law in China is a tortuous process, during which the top-down state will was the main power to push the enacting of laws and regulations.3 With the in-depth * Professor of Law, Director of the Economic Law Department, University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, P.R. China. ** Economic Law Department, University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, P.R. China. 1 The term ‘anti-monopoly law’ is used in this chapter to refer to all the laws and regulations policing monopoly, while the short name AML is used to refer to the Law of Anti-Monopoly, the formal antitrust code, i.e. the Anti-Monopoly Law of the People’s Republic of China enacted on 30 August 2007. 2 ‘Antitrust laws in general and the Sherman Act in particular, are the Magna Carta of free enterprise. They are as important to the preservation of economic freedom and our...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.