Cultural Diversity, European Identity and the Legitimacy of the EU
Show Less

Cultural Diversity, European Identity and the Legitimacy of the EU

  • Studies in EU Reform and Enlargement series

Edited by Dieter Fuchs and Hans-Dieter Klingemann

As a consequence of various rounds of EU enlargements, the degree of cultural diversity in Europe has intensified – a phenomenon which is increasingly perceived as problematic by many EU citizens. This fascinating book not only empirically explores the current state of the identity and the legitimacy of the EU as viewed by its citizens, but also evaluates their attitudes towards it.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 10: Cultural Diversity, European Identity and Legitimacy of the EU: Summary and Discussion

Dieter Fuchs, Hans-Dieter Klingemann and Andrea Schlenker-Fischer

Extract

10. Cultural diversity, European identity and the legitimacy of the EU: Summary and discussion Dieter Fuchs, Hans-Dieter Klingemann and Andrea Schlenker-Fischer Contributions to this volume deal with three sets of themes: first, the legitimacy of the European Union; second, the identity of the European Union; and third, the relation between legitimacy and identity in the European Union (EU). We discuss these themes in the general context of cultural diversity among member states. While the degree of cultural diversity has increased as a consequence of various rounds of EU enlargement, this increase is perceived more and more as a problem by many EU citizens. Part I of the book presents a review of the discussion of cultural diversity, European identity and legitimacy of the EU. Informed by this review of research findings a conceptual framework is proposed which is designed to guide empirical analysis and to identify research objectives. Part II focuses on the degree of European identity as well as the relation between national and European identity. It starts with an empirical survey of European identity and support for the EU. An analysis of the causes of support of the European Union and the emergence of a European identity is the main subject of Part III. The permissive consensus supporting European integration seems to be withering away in a widening and culturally more diverse Union that has acquired more and more decision-making powers. European integration has become politicized to the extent that it can no longer be regarded as an...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.