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Global Developments in Public Infrastructure Procurement

Evaluating Public–Private Partnerships and Other Procurement Options

Darrin Grimsey and Mervyn K. Lewis

There is widespread acceptance of the importance of infrastructure, but less agreement about how it should be funded and procured. While most public infrastructure is still provided in-house or by traditional procurement methods – with well-researched strengths and weaknesses – the development of service concession arrangements has seen a greater emphasis on lifecycle costing, risk assessment and asset design as featured in a variety of public private partnership (PPP) delivery models. This book examines the various procurement approaches, and provides a framework for comparing their advantages and disadvantages. Drawing on international experience, it considers some of the best and worst examples of PPPs, and infrastructure projects generally, along with the lessons for improving infrastructure procurement processes.
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Preface

Evaluating Public–Private Partnerships and Other Procurement Options

Darrin Grimsey and Mervyn K. Lewis

This is the third volume on infrastructure that we have prepared for Edward Elgar Publishing. Despite some overlap in content, this particular volume is designed to provide readers with a different perspective. This is evident immediately in Chapter 1 with an outline of China’s infrastructure-led growth strategy, continued in Chapters 2 and 11. The history of infrastructure developments continues to be mixed with contemporary accounts, but in the present incarnation history goes back further in time and places more emphasis on urbanization as a driver of innovation in infrastructure, along with science and technology. A discussion of public‒ private partnerships (PPPs) remains as a central theme, in part because of the controversy that this model continues to generate, but is extended to embrace the rich variety of procurement approaches that are now available. Decision-making processes for infrastructure are given more emphasis, drawing on both new databases for megaprojects, including PPPs, and recent theoretical developments in psychology and behavioural economics.

Other additions in this book come from an examination of the funding of infrastructure, value capture, asset recycling, road pricing and digital disruption in transport technology. Finally, readers of our earlier articles and volumes will discern a more eclectic, perhaps realistic, approach to procurement, based around people, not just models, shaped by practical experience and the realpolitik of government‒private sector interactions.

We thank Ben Carlton-Jones and Tristan Gleeson for their generous assistance with some of the tables. Again we owe a considerable, immeasurable debt to Kay Lewis who has prepared the manuscript, kept references under control, and has put both of us under pressure to complete the volume when at times each of us flagged.

Readers should note that with respect to one of the authors, Darrin Grimsey, the following disclaimer applies: ‘The views expressed in this book are the views of the authors, not Ernst & Young (EY). This book provides general information, does not constitute advice and should not be relied on as such. Professional advice should be sought prior to any action being taken in reliance on any of the information.’