Competition Law and Economics
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Competition Law and Economics

Advances in Competition Policy Enforcement in the EU and North America

Edited by Abel M. Mateus and Teresa Moreira

Competition policy is at a crossroads on both sides of the Atlantic. In this insightful book, judges, enforcers and academics in law and economics look at the consensus built so far and clarify controversies surrounding the issue.
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Chapter 2: Helping Europeans Get the Best Deal: A Sound Competition Policy for Well-functioning Markets

Neelie Kroes

Extract

2. Helping Europeans get the best deal: a sound competition policy for wellfunctioning markets Neelie Kroes I would like to congratulate the Presidency and the Portuguese Competition Authority for bringing us together for this Second Lisbon Conference. Today we also celebrate European Competition Day, and I am pleased to see so many national competition authorities and ministries represented here, alongside judges, academics and practitioners from both sides of the Atlantic. It is apt that we are meeting here in Belém, just up the road from where the great Portuguese explorers set off to discover what lay on the other side of the ocean. I am sure that over the next two days we will once again see that the links across the Atlantic are stronger than ever. I am convinced that the similarities of our approaches to competition far outweigh the differences. In particular, we all agree on one basic and fundamental fact: competition policy is first and foremost there to serve the consumer. But it requires constant commitment and constant efforts to get the best out of free but fair markets, and pass these benefits to our citizens. 1. TOWARDS MORE EFFICIENT AND MORE EFFECTIVE STATE AID So first to the theme of this European Competition Day: state aid. As you know, the fundamental overhaul of our European state aid rules has been the ongoing priority of my mandate. None of our Member States has unlimited resources. None of them can afford to waste tax-payers’ money. What is...

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