Security of Energy Supply in Europe
Show Less

Security of Energy Supply in Europe

Natural Gas, Nuclear and Hydrogen

  • Loyola de Palacio Series on European Energy Policy

Edited by François Lévêque, Jean-Michel Glachant, Julián Barquín, Christian von Hirschhausen, Franziska Holz and William J. Nuttall

In economic, technical and political terms, the security of energy supply is of the utmost importance for Europe. Alongside competition and sustainability, supply security represents a cornerstone of the EU’s energy policy, and in times of rising geopolitical conflict plays an increasingly important role in its external relations. Within this context, the contributors analyse and explore the natural gas, nuclear, and hydrogen energy sectors, which will be of critical significance for the future of energy supplies in Europe.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details

Chapter 3: The New Security Environment for European Gas: Worsening Geopolitics and Increasing Global Competition for LNG

Jonathan Stern

Extract

3. The new security environment for European gas: worsening geopolitics and increasing global competition for LNG Jonathan Stern INTRODUCTION: A NEW SECURITY ENVIRONMENT 1 Security of European gas supply became a very topical subject following the cuts in Russian supplies to Ukraine in the first days of 2006 which had the consequence of briefly restricting the availability of supplies to some European countries. Much of the subsequent discourse has been concerned with ‘the arithmetic of gas security’ expressed as current and projected national or collective dependence of European countries on non-OECD suppliers (or groups of suppliers) over the next 15–25 years. Increasing dependence is directly correlated with growing insecurity, defined as the likelihood that gas exporting countries will cut off, or threaten to cut off, supplies to importing countries in support of their commercial and political (foreign policy) demands. The European Union (EU) has responded to the prospect of growing import dependence with the publication, since 2000, of two Green Papers (EU, 2000, 2006a) plus a security of supply directive (EU, 2004) and an energy policy document (EU, 2007). Even if these projections of future dependence are believed to be correct, concerns about the resulting commercial and political leverage form only a small part of a security environment. It also includes a cluster of short- and long-term issues among which are resource availability, technical breakdown and accident, terrorist attack, political instability, and lack of timely investment, as well as disagreements in relation to existing and future supplies and prices,...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.