Research Handbook on Corporate Social Responsibility in Context
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Research Handbook on Corporate Social Responsibility in Context

Edited by Anders Örtenblad

Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a universal idea? Is the same exact definition of CSR relevant for any organization, regardless of context? Or would such a definition need to be adapted to fit different types of organizations, in different cultures, industries and sectors? This book discusses how CSR preferably should be practiced in various generalized contexts. Experts share their knowledge on whether a broad definition of CSR can be practiced as is or if it first has to undergo changes, in as various generalized contexts as Buddhist and Islamic organizations, developing countries, the food processing industry, the shipping industry, and the pharmaceutical industry.
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Chapter 19: The future of CSR: towards transformative CSR, or CSR 2.0

Wayne Visser

Abstract

This chapter argues that CSR, as a business, governance and ethics system, has failed. This assumes that success or failure is measured in terms of the net impact (positive or negative) of business on society and the environment. The chapter contends that a different kind of CSR is needed if we are to reverse the current direction of many of the world’s most pressing social, environmental and ethical trends. The chapter reviews business’s historical progress over the stages of CSR: moving through defensive, charitable, promotional and strategic CSR approaches respectively. The chapter examines the three curses of modern CSR (incremental, peripheral and uneconomic), before exploring what CSR might look like in an emerging age of responsibility. This new CSR – called transformative CSR or CSR 2.0 – is based on five principles (creativity, scalability, responsiveness, glocality and circularity) and forms the basis for a new DNA model of responsible business, built around the four elements of value creation, good governance, societal contribution and environmental integrity.

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