Cities and Sustainable Technology Transitions
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Cities and Sustainable Technology Transitions

Leadership, Innovation and Adoption

Edited by Marina van Geenhuizen, J. Adam Holbrook and Mozhdeh Taheri

This enlightening book elucidates the leadership challenges of various cities in emerging transitions towards higher levels of sustainability. It examines elements of three socio-technical systems, energy, transport and healthcare, while addressing technology invention, commercialization, mass-production and adoption. The book breaks new ground in the analysis of topical issues such as local ‘cradle’ conditions, incentive schemes, niche-development, living labs, impact bonds, grass-roots intermediation and adaptive policy making. It offers a broad coverage of global systems of cities, with a particular focus on Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands, China, Korea, Japan, the US and Canada.
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Chapter 14: Enhancing public sector innovation: living lab case studies on well-being services in Lahti, Finland

Suvi Konsti-Laakso, Satu Pekkarinen and Helinä Melkas

Abstract

In this chapter, living labs are perceived as open networks through which new innovations can be developed. The study deals with innovation in the public sector and examines renewal of well-being services for citizens in a regional context, such as establishment of a social enterprise for mental and addiction rehabilitees; use of a service robot in public elderly care; new ways for dentists to increase participation of teenagers in dental care. Using a multiple case study design, a cross-section of 14 living lab initiatives in Lahti (Finland) is analysed and the outcomes presented. Four different outcome categories are identified and analysed: access, windows, new solutions and new capabilities. Specific attention is given to outcomes for utilisers. Furthermore, the results contribute to an improved understanding of regional living lab activities and key conditions for their success, as well as the success of public sector health services, often as an institutional innovation.

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