Handbook on the Geographies of Globalization
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Handbook on the Geographies of Globalization

Edited by Robert C. Kloosterman, Virginie Mamadouh and Pieter Terhorst

Processes of globalization have changed the world in many, often fundamental, ways. Increasingly these processes are being debated and contested. This Handbook offers a timely, rich as well as critical panorama of these multifaceted processes with up-to-date chapters by renowned specialists from many countries. It comprises chapters on the historical background of globalization, different geographical perspectives (including world systems analysis and geopolitics), the geographies of flows (of people, goods and services, and capital), and the geographies of places (including global cities, clusters, port cities and the impact of climate change).
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Chapter 12: Migration, families and households in globalizing Asia

Brenda S.A. Yeoh, Shirlena Huang and Theodora Lam

Abstract

This chapter examines the conceptual tools that have gained traction in understanding the links between globalization, transnational migration, families and households in the context of Asia, particularly East and Southeast Asia. We discuss two complementary approaches in particular, namely, ‘transnational families’ and ‘global householding’, and argue for recognizing the ‘family’ and ‘household’ as important sites and scales of analysis to think about globalization as an integral aspect of the social sphere, and as a route to understanding the inner workings of ‘intimate globalization’. The chapter goes on to develop two themes of particular relevance to Asia: first, how the feminization of migration has impacted the gender politics of social reproduction in families and households in source communities, especially in terms of gender identities, relations and subjectivities; and second, how care-driven migration is transforming the provision of intergenerational care along gender, class and other dimensions in both source and receiving societies in Asia. A brief conclusion highlights the need to place families and households on the research agenda in globalizing Asia.

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