Climate Change and the UN Security Council
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Climate Change and the UN Security Council

Edited by Shirley V. Scott and Charlotte Ku

In this forward-looking book, the authors consider how the United Nations Security Council could assist in addressing the global security challenges brought about by climate change. Contributing authors contemplate how the UNSC could prepare for this role; progressing the debate from whether and why the council should act on climate insecurity, to how? Scholars, activists, and policy makers will find this book a fertile source of innovative thinking and an invaluable basis on which to develop policy.
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Chapter 3: Climate change and economic measures: One assumption and one scenario too many?

Francesco Sindico and Mallory Orme

Abstract

This chapter provides insight into the potential use of economic measures implemented by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) to address climate change-related conflict. While there is still considerable debate on the extent to which climate change can be considered a threat to international peace and security, for the purposes of this discussion this assumption is accepted as valid. Furthermore, for economic measures to be a relevant strategy, it is given that a country or other entity subject to international law could be characterized as responsible for actions contributing to climate change. With these considerations in mind, this chapter aims to discuss types of economic sanctions enacted by the UNSC, and also to start a discussion on what a ‘climate-smart’ sanction or measure would look like. Finally, the authors consider how the UNSC could work in conjunction with existing climate frameworks as framed in the Paris Agreement to take a cohesive and unified approach in implementing long-term climate-smart economic procedures.

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