Handbook of Behavioural Change and Public Policy
Show Less

Handbook of Behavioural Change and Public Policy

Edited by Holger Straßheim and Silke Beck

Behavioural change has become a core issue of public policy. Behavioural instruments such as ‘nudging’ apply insights from behavioural economics and behavioural sciences, psychology and neurosciences across a broad range of policy areas. Behavioural insights teams and networks facilitate the global spread of behavioural public policies. Despite an ever-growing amount of literature, research has remained fragmented. This comprehensive Handbook unites interdisciplinary scholarship, with contributions critically assessing the state and direction of behavioural public policies, their normative implications and political consequences.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 22: Nudging: ethical and political dimensions of choice architectures

Mark D. White

Abstract

Nudges – the subtle manipulation of options to steer people’s decision-making in specific directions said to be in their best interests – have been embraced by governments around the world as preferable to more heavy-handed or coercive regulation of behaviour. This chapter discusses several philosophical issues with nudges, including the ignorance on the part of policy-makers regarding individuals’ true interests (the epistemic issue), the effect on autonomy of policy tools that bypass individuals’ deliberative processes (the ethical issue), and the possible deleterious effects of nudges on decision-making processes (the practical issue). This chapter also addresses the more general question raised by nudge policy about the proper role of government in the self-regarding decisions of individuals, and suggests ways to improve deliberative processes without co-opting them.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.