Resilience, Crisis and Innovation Dynamics
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Resilience, Crisis and Innovation Dynamics

Edited by Tüzin Baycan and Hugo Pinto

Resilience has emerged as a recurrent notion to explain how territorial socio-economic systems adapt successfully (or not) to negative events. In this book, the authors use resilience as a bridging notion to connect different types of theoretical and empirical approaches to help understand the impacts of economic turbulence at the system and actor levels. The book provides a unique overview of the financial crisis and the important dimension of innovation dynamics for regional resilience. It also offers an engaging debate as to how regional resilience can be improved and explores the social aspects of vulnerability, resilience and innovation.
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Chapter 12: Role of engineering education in the transition of industry: central steering or local resilience?

Francisco Javier Ortega-Colomer, Elias Pekkola and Tuomo Heinonen

Abstract

This study analyses two different geographical settings in a comparative perspective where higher education institutions have played an important role in the modernization of industrial manufacturers. Both settings – the cities of Alcoy (Spain) and Tampere (Finland) – are historically important centres of industry, which showed a down-turn in production, but now aim to be new kinds of innovation hubs in their respective areas. A historical analysis, based on secondary data, is presented as a means to understand the recent resilience and evolution of both regions, in terms of their capacity for facing societal challenges in different periods, such as the growth of inequalities, the creation of new related industries, the globalization process and the financial crisis. An emphasis is placed on the complex relationships among geographical, institutional and individual dynamics that enable the commissioning of heterogeneous innovation processes for resilience. The variety of cooperation and competition linkages identified through qualitative interviewing among local actors in different periods allows us to show practical guidelines with the objective of not inventing the future of the university without being sure lessons have been learned from past successes and failures.

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