Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes
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Globalization, International Spillovers and Sectoral Changes

Implications for Regions and Industries

Edited by Charlie Karlsson, Andreas P. Cornett and Tina Wallin

As a consequence of globalization, news, ideas and knowledge are moving quickly across national borders and generating international spillovers. So too, however, are economic and financial crises. Combining a variety of methods, concepts and interdisciplinary approaches, this book provides an in-depth examination of these structural changes and their impact. Assessing the implications of globalization for businesses and sectors, chapters focus on the interdependencies between different economic and political layers, and explore topics such as human capital, creativity, innovation, networks and collaboration.
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Chapter 5: Yanagiya: one of the best-practice manufacturing SMEs in Japan

Makoto Hirano, Mitsuhiro Kurashige and Kiyonori Sakakibara

Abstract

Yanagiya Machinery Co. Ltd was initially involved in processing local fish to steamed fish paste, as one of the small regional enterprises in Japanese traditional craft-like industries, over 100 years ago. However, they have recently grown to be a medium-sized enterprise with over 150 employees and annual sales of over 4 billion yen. Their current business areas are designing, manufacturing and selling machines for producing processed foods – mainly steamed fish paste. Nowadays, they are developing and exporting machines for a variety of manufacturing needs within the processed foods industry. This chapter describes how they have shifted their operations to such a growing market domain and how they have developed original technologies with competitive competence. Their experience of transforming the business could be instructive to other regional small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in declining manufacturing industries.

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