Women, Business and Leadership
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Women, Business and Leadership

Gender and Organisations

Edited by Alexander-Stamatios Antoniou, Cary Cooper and Caroline Gatrell

This timely and comprehensive book analyses the role of women in leadership from both managerial and socio-emotional perspectives. The authors review the issues that affect real women in business and evaluate what can be done to support and develop women managers. Chapters explore topics such as the stereotyping of leading women, gender equality and discrimination, the glass ceiling and barriers to promotion, the work/home conflict, the gender pay gap and job insecurity, female authority and career development.
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Chapter 26: A blind spot in organization studies: gender with ethnicity, nationality and religion

Shehla Riza Arifeen and Caroline Gatrell

Abstract

This chapter makes a case for empirical research in regard to British Pakistani managerial and professional women, a group who have remained invisible in organization studies; to give voice to their experiences, to highlight the issues and challenges they are facing as women who have careers, their perceptions of what they are and how they have reached where they are, and where they think they are going, while taking an all-inclusive view of the historical/social/culture/religious context. The chapter undertakes a comprehensive re-examination of the intersectional approach. An approach to gender with ethnicity and with religion and nationality or diaspora is suggested, in order to capture identities and focuses on relationship between gender and other categories of difference, in particular gender. A review of race/ethnicity in organization studies in the UK reveals the homogenizing of ethnicities and a gap, as there is a lack of focused research on a large ethnic group in the UK. The chapter argues for intersectionality as being the most valid method as a means of analysis of a complex phenomenon, as it bridges partly the theoretical gap between critical theory and liberalism or deconstructionist tradition. Empirical research on this marginalized group of women will highlight the structures and systems that are created and maintained. These may be self-created and self-perpetuated, but unless and until voice has been given to their experiences they will remain unknown.

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