Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)Justice
Show Less

Reconstruction and the Arc of Racial (in)Justice

Edited by Julian M. Hayter and George R. Goethals

This collection of original essays and commentary considers not merely how history has shaped the continuing struggle for racial equality, but also how backlash and resistance to racial reforms continue to dictate the state of race in America. Informed by a broad historical perspective, this book focuses primarily on the promise of Reconstruction, and the long demise of that promise. It traces the history of struggles for racial justice from the post US Civil War Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era, the Civil Rights and Voting Rights decades of the 1950s and 1960s to the present day.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 6: The post-emancipation city of the dead

Thomas J. Brown

Abstract

Chapter 6 examines the “mortuary politics” of Reconstruction. Thomas J. Brown examines Randolph Cemetery in Columbia, South Carolina, which as a burial institution became a promotion for African American access to elected office and African American militia service. Furthermore, Brown considers how this segregated cemetery could form a conceptual bridge to later racial integration.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.