Services, Experiences and Innovation
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Services, Experiences and Innovation

Integrating and Extending Research

Edited by Ada Scupola and Lars Fuglsang

Whilst innovation has traditionally focused on manufacturing, recently research surrounding service innovation has been flourishing. Furthermore, as consumers become ever more sophisticated and look for experiences, a research field investigating this topic has also emerged. This book aims to develop an integrated approach to the field of experience and services through innovation by showing that it is necessary to take several factors into account. As such, it makes a substantial and compelling contribution to the interdependencies between innovation, services and experience research.
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Chapter 16: Wake up and smell the coffee: Innovation in the coffee shop experience

Ian Miles, Ming-Fei Lee and Kantima Sawatwarakul

Abstract

Coffee shops are rich in experience, even if their explicit functions seems to be the provision of consumables. It has been common to ascribe business model innovation to the international coffee shop chains that have helped spread coffee culture to East Asian countries. This chapter examines coffee shops in two of these countries (Thailand and Taiwan). It finds much innovative effort underway, centred not only on the food and beverages supplied, but also on other elements shaping consumer experience – such as decor, location of activities and arrangement of devices, and the roles assigned to staff. High levels of innovation, of many forms, appear in both large chains and smaller shops; even the most traditional venues are balancing their maintenance of heritage with the introduction of novelty. Since many experience industries are also likely to display substantial innovation, and researchers should look beyond the narrow categories that have been the focus of most innovation studies.

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