Loss of Homes and Evictions across Europe
Show Less

Loss of Homes and Evictions across Europe

A Comparative Legal and Policy Examination

Edited by Padraic Kenna, Sergio Nasarre-Aznar, Peter Sparkes and Christoph U. Schmid

The loss of a home can lead to major violations of a person’s dignity and human rights. Yet, evictions take place everyday in all countries across Europe. This book provides a comparative assessment of human rights, administrative, procedural and public policy norms, in the context of eviction, across a number of European jurisdictions. Through this comparison the book exposes the emergence of consistent, Europe-wide standards and norms.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 6: Evictions in Italy

Elena Bargelli and Giulia Donadio

Abstract

Evictions in Italy have recently acquired primary importance on the political agenda and in public debate due to a dramatic surge in ouster proceedings from rented and privately owned residential tenures. This chapter starts with an overview of the eviction policy in the Italian legal system. It focuses on the socioeconomic factors related to evictions and the measures designed to prevent arrears, cease evictions from owned primary residences, as well as measures that postpone evictions from rented primary residences. Against this backdrop, the chapter then focuses on the right to housing as a fundamental right, as articulated as an expression of the Italian constitutional principles of social solidarity (Article 2) and equality (Article 3). The chapter subsequently examines the procedures leading to eviction in particular areas (mortgaged properties, rented housing, unauthorised occupancies), and clarifies their respective procedural phases. The chapter then identifies various common risk factors for evictions and provides a brief case-law summary in order to highlight the existence of best practices in response to increasing eviction proceedings in Italy.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.