Handbook of Research on Stress and Well-Being in the Public Sector
Show Less

Handbook of Research on Stress and Well-Being in the Public Sector

Edited by Ronald J. Burke and Silvia Pignata

This timely Handbook addresses the concepts of stress and well-being among workers in various public sector roles and occupations across the globe. Emphasizing the importance of well-being and stress prevention initiatives in ever-changing workplace environments, this Handbook highlights successful organizational initiatives and provides insight into best practice for promoting healthy employees and workplaces. Containing contributions from leading international experts in their respective fields, the contributors hope that this multi-disciplinary Handbook will help to enhance the health and well-being of public sector employees.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
You do not have access to this content

Chapter 10: Stress and well-being in prison officers

Andrew J. Clements, Gail Kinman and Jacqui Hart

Abstract

Prison officers are at greater risk of work-related stress than most other occupations in the UK. The rates of mental health problems and burnout in the profession are also comparatively high. Challenges to the well-being of prison staff include heavy workloads, lack of autonomy and support, low resources, role stressors and exposure to aggression and violence. In this chapter the authors draw on research conducted by themselves and others that identifies the key stressors experienced by UK prison officers and the implications for their well-being and job performance. Particular focus is placed on their research that has utilized the Health and Safety Executive Management Standards framework to diagnose the psychosocial hazards experienced by prison staff, but other stressors, such as personal experiences of aggression and violence, poor recovery opportunities and presenteeism, are also considered. They argue that carefully targeted, multilevel interventions are needed to address the challenges faced by the sector and identify priorities for future research.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.


Further information

or login to access all content.