In memoriam: Andrea Rizzi
Gaetano Dimita
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Yin Harn Lee
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Michaela MacDonald
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This is a special issue of the IELR in more than one sense.

Firstly, we would like to dedicate this issue to the memory of a close friend, Andrea Rizzi, who has been part of the interactive entertainment family since the beginning. He was at the foundation of this journal in 2018 as a member of the Editorial Board and a contributor. He also lectured on the Interactive Entertainment Law LLM module at the Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary University of London, every year without fail, flying in on purpose from Milan or wherever his Harley Davidson had taken him. We asked Nicoletta Serao to write a few words to remember him.

Secondly, it is also an opportunity for us to acknowledge and celebrate the fact that it has been 10 years since the LLM module in Interactive Entertainment Law was launched at CCLS, QMUL, being the first module of its kind in Europe. A decade later, this area of law has grown exponentially and become ever more complex and expansive. The topics it covers – and which the Interactive Entertainment Law Review has published on – range from the expected (intellectual property law, competition law) to the more esoteric (gambling law and regulation, freedom of expression and tax law). Back in 2013, we could not imagine that a specialist journal would have grown so broadly, so quickly. Games are indeed everything.

The articles in this issue reflect this broad diversity of interests that push the boundaries of interactive entertainment law scholarship. Gary Rinkerman’s ‘Artificial Intelligence and Evolving Issues under US Copyright and Patent Law’ helps the reader navigate a path through what has rapidly become a complex and multi-faceted area of enquiry and invites us to revisit fundamental questions such as what ‘counts’ as creativity and innovation in the face of seemingly unstoppable technological innovation. In ‘The Very First Collecting Society for Games’, Christian-Henner Hentsch offers an intriguing overview of the Verwertungsgesellschaft für die Hersteller von Games (‘VHG’), the first collecting society of its kind for video games, founded by the German Games Industry Association, and explains how this gives video game companies from all over the world the opportunity to build up a revenue stream in Germany. In ‘Yellow Card to Video Game Companies: An Analysis of the Infringement of Football Players’ Image Rights in Brazil’, Larissa Ferreira Martins discusses an issue which is particularly pertinent for sports games and presents some practical approaches for the video game industry in navigating Brazil’s highly protective laws on image rights. A second piece focusing on Brazilian law, Otávio Henrique Baumgarten Arrabal’s ‘Case review: HARDLINE vs. BATTLEFIELD HARDLINE’ takes a close look at the video game industry’s ongoing efforts at using trade marks to safeguard their investment in their game titles, and the limitations of such an approach. Finally, in her review of Joshua Bycer’s Game Design Deep Dive: Free-to-Play, Weiwei Yi highlights the relevance of insights developed in the context of game design for legal researchers working on topics as diverse as gambling regulation, consumer protection and data protection.

We are also pleased to announce that Dr Alina Trapova from University College London has joined our editorial board. Alina has been a stalwart contributor to and peer reviewer for the IELR for several years now, and we are delighted that she has agreed to take on an even more involved role in the running of the journal.

We hope you will enjoy the issue.

Gaetano, Yin Harn and Michaela